The Slaves of Freedom ?

by Shabana S. on Juin 16, 2013 - 9:52am

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/apr/29/bangladesh-factory-tragedy-sweatshop-economics

This article got my attention, because it was about an event that had occured outside of Canada and I am usually interested knowing about what is happening elsewhere. Sweatshops are widely practiced in less developped countries, however this article relates to the poor working cinditions in Bangladesh. Where people work for low wages, long hours, and unhealthy working conditions. There are two movements; the Anti-Sweatshop refers to the movement that focuses to improve the abusive nature of sweatshop. It started in the 19th century in some industrialized countries and the Pro-sweatshop arguments, that focuses on favoring sweatshops and usually brings up the positive aspects of sweatshop.

Are the working conditions that the workers are exposed to ethical?

It is immoral to abuse of others when on power, not that it is good when you are not on power, but it is even worst when the victim is vulnerable. And in this case, the victims involved are women, children and disabled people. Nobody deserves to live off wages so low that they can barely afford the essentials like food and shelter. There should be efforts of improvement taken in order to change things into a better working environment for these abused workers. It has been proven that a person’s work environment affects a their emotional and physical state, and if these workers are working in a environment that is so abusive than obviously it can affect them very negatively. Children are detached from their families; they are not even permitted to take a break in order visit their families. The working conditions are intense moreover the most disturbing is that women are forced to by their boss to take birth control pills to prevent future pregnancy, the boss are obviously not supporting maternity leave.

As the Pro-sweatshop movement states that there are worst jobs such as trash picking, prostitution and in worst-case scenario unemployment. It's all about free will and acknowledging that a person has the right and the ability to make decisions for themselves. But these workers are victims, who are not really left with a choice, in other words, it is either starvation or minimum wage.

Do you think that the West should get involved in these countries, in order to improve the worker’s condition?

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