Member Comments

  • Reply to: Art to contribute   6 années 5 mois ago

    I have never particularly been exposed to the reality of big cats being endangered because of the different things people subject them to. It would have been nice if you could elaborate on what Richardson's ambitions are for current and future projects. But otherwise, I think that it is an interesting take on trying to publicize the realities of wildcat exploitation by using art. I, personally, have always been fascinated by art but I know that many people do not appreciate art as much now. I think that in this day and age, a lot of people have access to the internet and many people have at least one account on a social media forum, which would allow people to 'share' the art for the cause of raising awareness for the topic. But I often wonder if there are other creative ways to raise awareness about the exploitation of wildcats. Because, for myself, when looking at pictures on the internet, I tend to passively pay attention to what I see therefore it is easy for me to forget what I have seen unless it was a shocking image or story, or the way what was trying to be said was portrayed in a creative way. If an image was shocking to me, like the image in the following link http://bigcatrescue.org/abuse-issues/issues/pet-cubs/tigerpoachingskins/, I would definitely remember it. I think that if there were different tactics being used at the same time to raise awareness about the exploitation, it would be successful. For example, there can be a carnival type of event where it can be a family event and the theme of the carnival would be to educate people about the cause. There can be games where it can teach children about the big cats, and what is being done o them. All the money that is raised from playing games can be used to help the cats that are in need.

  • Reply to: Volunteering Experience with REACH School   6 années 5 mois ago

    I think you have risen many good points when it comes to the topic of physically/mentally individuals and physical activity. I think there is a lot of work to be done to have proper and consistent social support, and to try to alleviate and even remove the stigma against disabled individuals. They are the same as non-disabled individuals, they just have a different perspectives of the same situations and their perspectives are the still valid. I think that if physical activity is done in moderation, and done in an enjoyable environment like Defi Sportif, it really encourages everyone to partake in (and even organize) more activities! I think lack of knowledge about this cause is still needs to have a lot more awareness about it. I think a lot of people think that a mentally disabled individual's body works entirely different than from someone 'normal', but its that their bodies need a different type of care (as suggested in the following link http://www.down-syndrome.org/reviews/27/).

  • Reply to: Do Death-Row Inmates Deserve Health Treatments   6 années 7 mois ago

    I think what you said in your post is very thought-provoking and gives (background) information on the death penalty. I personally do agree with you in the statement of killing the convicted criminal soon after the conviction. The state might as well get something over with as soon as possible rather than just waiting up to thirty or more years before killing someone. But the following link gives evidence that would say otherwise:
    http://deathpenalty.org/section.php?id=13
    It has been a huge debate on the frequency of how often the death penalty is being used in different countries, or even different cities of a single country (i.e.: different states f the U.S.). The lack of even death penalty enforcement, despite having the same policy in a single place, tends to be subjective. It has also been found that there have been convicted prisoners who have already been killed by the state but later to be proven innocent to through new (or newly looked over) evidence.

  • Reply to: Mary was a Whore: Prostitution, the Law, and Ethics   6 années 7 mois ago

    It is true that the topic of legalization of prostitution is not an easy debate to choose sides on. It is definitely a multi-faceted topic, in which may affect more people than we are aware of. I think you have brought up a good point that depending on how you look at prostitution, it may affect the end-opinion.
    I have to admit though, I think you may need to offer more background information to readers, especially if a reader is not as educated about the policies or laws about prostitution.
    The following are links to explicitly state the pros and cons of the legalization of prostitution and what the policies are in countries where prostitution is actually legal:
    http://www.debate.org/legalized-prostitution/
    http://prostitution.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000772

  • Reply to: Supreme Court of Canada rules in favour of assisted-suicide   6 années 8 mois ago

    I think it is great that Canada has finally gotten the ball rolling in the conversation about medically assisted suicide. I was aware that the Supreme Court is in favour of assisted suicide, and I was extremely happy about this ruling, but I was not aware of any of the details of how the Supreme Court got to this ruling. I find that all the arguments that were used for the pros and cons of the subject very interesting and I had not particularly known about them before.
    I personally think that people should have the ability to make the decision of if they want to do die. It is a great step forward for Canada in the rights of people in compromised health. But I must agree with about policies. There has to be very strict policies about implementing medically assisted suicide. I think that medical professionals and people interested in medically assisted suicide must be fully informed about all legal and medical details about what it is.

  • Reply to: Stress: How to Use it to Your Advantage   6 années 8 mois ago

    I find it quite interesting, in fact, that there is such a longitudinal study that has been conducted about stress. To me, it is even more fascinating that the findings of the study have correlated that stress is not necessarily the health risk but it is the individual's perspective of what stress that can cause serious health issues.
    Personally, whenever I get stressed, I have sleep deprivation, I subconsciously grind my teeth together, and other such negative health hazards. I know that there are not many resources from schools or workplaces to obtain coping skills or mechanisms on how to handle stress. But the world of the internet can be quite vast in information, and if you look in the right places, you can find what you need to cope with stress. Such as the following site that gives tips on stress management: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/stress/stress-management.htm
    This is a great post, opens up a better understanding of stress.

  • Reply to: Expelled from school because of their skin color: the harsh reality of African American students in the United States   6 années 11 mois ago

    I really like how you kept me interested in your writing by stating the facts and you seem to make well informed opinions and thoughts on the issue at hand.
    I was vaguely aware of the situation where black students were being expelled from school and being called on by their teachers to the police for minor and manageable situations (that do not need the assistance of the police). But I never thought it was a huge problem, therefore I never particularly searched for more information about this area of racism. I had originally thought that it was just a few independent cases in which situations have gone to such drastic measures where students needed to be expelled or teachers needed police assistance. I personally never encountered this extent of racism in school in great detail, and I wonder if this kind of `new racism` in the school system is as problematic in Canada as it is in the United States. I have pondered as well about if there was a correlation between racism and school dropout rates.
    I am half black myself. I have noticed that I have been getting the same message from different places (i.e.: friends, media, etc.) that if I had a problem, I can talk to a teacher or school administrator that I trusted. But whenever I would attempt to do so, I have noticed that the school staff would be hesitant and unwilling to talk to me, whereas if a white friend of mine did the same (and had the same problem), the school staff would be there for them with open arms.
    In a sense, I think this new form of racism in the school system could also be classified under the concept of White Privilege. White students are treated with more `traditional` and `normal` punishments for their actions while black students are punished with more severe consequences for the same type of behaviours. I personally do not doubt the qualifications and capabilities of employees of the education system, but I think that all staff members should undergo a course in which would educate the employees about how all of them (secretaries, teachers, principals, etc.) play a major role in teaching the younger generation of our society. The course should teach them how their (subtle or blatant) attitudes and behaviours leave an impression on the all the students and gives the students something else to learn, that is not supposed to be learnt and is not part of the educational curriculum. The problem with this solution would be, who would teach this type of course?

  • Reply to: "It's OK! He's Mentally Ill"   6 années 11 mois ago

    I really like what you've written. You are to the point, no beat around the bush. You make very good points on how skin colour is being viewed and portrayed in the media on criminal activities. I also have noticed how the media attempts to speculate the motives to why the individuals committed the crime. It is interesting how the media picks out what to voice to the public about the individual's life (i.e.: skin colour, religion, socioeconomic status, etc.). But I have to point out that a very small amount of individuals who are put on trial for the crimes they have committed use the insanity defense and an even smaller amount of people who use this particular defense actually succeed and win the trials with this specific defense.
    White Privilege is a very interesting topic though. White Privilege is giving Caucasian individuals (the dominant group in Canada and the United States) the subconscious benefit and rewards based on someone's skin colour, and may exclude them from certain negative judgments that are being associated with groups belonging to visible minorities. I can speculate that when a Caucasian individual would commit a serious crime (for example, a mass shooting), the media would most likely focus on if the individual had had any mental illnesses in their past. The media can enforce the concept of White Privilege by assuming this Caucasian individual was from a financially comfortable family, with no history of problems. If the individual who committed the same type of crime was part of a visible minority, the media may assume that this individual came from a struggling, immigrant family that had a lot of problems.
    I often wonder though, if in other countries it is the same sort of problem (having a stark contrast between how different groups are being portrayed, especially in the media). History has always played a large role to how we behave today, and society is slow to progress if there are no individuals who are radical or feel strongly enough to change the way society currently is. So with all the knowledge we have about the current state of things, I wonder who is going to want to change it?

    Here are some links for more information:
    Insanity Defence: http://psychology.jrank.org/pages/336/Insanity-Defense.html
    White Privilege: http://www.whiteprivilegeconference.com/white_privilege.html

  • Reply to: Anything For Beauty?   7 années 1 jour ago

    The title reminded my group (Amandine, Rola, Jessica) and I of something my class had spoken about in class. The topic of cosmetic surgery not only touches on the topic of gender but also on race. We had viewed a documentary called 'Shadeism' where it talked about women of colour bleaching their skin in order to look more 'beautiful' and like the women that are seen in magazines. We agree with what you have said in your post about cosmetic surgeries and their side effects. Not only does cosmetic surgery affect a person physical being but it affect someone's feelings, and how others truly feel about them. By going through procedures such as skin bleaching, you also agree with racism and there exists a hierarchy of different shades of skin tones, the lighter someone is the more superior they are. This article and documentary make us wonder why we keep inflicting such radical procedures upon ourselves if they have such detrimental effects on individuals and society by promoting racism.

  • Reply to: You Won't Get Noticed Anyways   7 années 2 semaines ago

    I feel like you have read my mind! What you have written is exactly on point with everything I have noticed in the media, and how the media talks about the appearance of (mainly) women. I remember when I was younger, my older sister used to spend an insane amount of time getting ready, and trying to look 'perfect' to only step out of the house to make a quick five-minute run to the corner store. Eventually I did try to buy into what magazines were saying and tried to look skinny and beautiful by taking an extended period of time to look good, but gladly I quickly got tired of doing so. Now, when it comes to appearance, I do things for myself and whatever is comfortable to me. And by doing that, I am confident.
    Your writing is very poignant, too the point (no beat around the bush), and very well thought out. Very good observations about what is occurring in the media (magazines, advertisements, etc.). It is good that you have pointed out that a lot of the criticism comes from those who do not 'take care' of themselves (i.e.: balding men with large stomachs), but it may also good to note that men experience similar scrutiny as women. I'd like to state that it is not the same experiences but similar. It has been a rising topic nowadays that men are also subject to looking like the 'perfect' man. Men who are posing in magazines are typically tall, have extremely muscular frames (ones in which are hard to achieve for the average male) and have chiseled features in their facial features and other such body parts. The average male might feel pressured to undergo hours of exercising to achieve such muscular features, and some might even undergo the extent of surgery to achieve a muscular frame or have good facial features. Women have the advantage of using make up to hide their embarrassing facial features (such as acne) but men typically do not use make up, therefore resorting to more permanent procedures.