Hippotherapy treaments help children with special needs

by penelopesaunders on September 6, 2016 - 11:42am

The issue that the article was discussing, was whether or not children with special needs benefit from hippotherapy treatment. Author Maureen Wallace, explains hippotherapy as “ ‘[…] the use of the movement of the horse as a treatment strategy by physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech/language pathologists to address impairments, functional limitations and disabilities in patients with neuromotor and sensory dysfunction.’ ” After reading this article, the conclusion that the author draws is very clear, she believes that hippotherapy treatments does help when it comes to children with more particular needs.

1.    If hippotherapy is present in a “child’s plan of care”, this has been seen to improve mobility.

2.    Mobility is increased because of the neurologic responses that hippotherapy provides.

3.    Lori Garone, a physical therapist explains that “the horse's movement… access[es a patient's] central nervous system… by the repetitive and innate rhythm of the horse's walk.”

4.    Garone, also mentions that the repetitive movement of the horse walking creates “ ‘new motor, sensory and speech pathways in the brain.’ ”

5.    Each child is different and needs specific types of treatments in order for them to reach their goals. Hippotherapy can help them reach their goals faster, whether they be developmental, motor or speech goals.

6.    A parent of a child benefitting from hippotherapy says that “Hippotherapy is more effective than traditional therapies because horses have a unique ability to motivate children to try new things.”

7.    In North Carolina, at Shining Hope Farms, there had been an addition of 50 children to the hippotherapy program in less than 3 month, some children are even on a waiting list because the demand has increased.

8.    The author concludes the article with the story of Ashley’s 8 year-old son who suffers from down syndrome and who recently started benefitting from hippotherapy.

Children with special needs therefore benefit from hippotherapy treatments. I am convinced by the conclusion that the author draws, because she used facts, examples and mentioned people with relative certified backgrounds. 

 

Link to article: http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/993705/hippotherapy-treatment-helps-children-with-special-needs

Comments

Hi! I found the subject really interesting. The fact that horseback riding may be an alternative to traditional treatment is probably very appealing to those who are interested in horses and who may benefit from this treatment. Also, I really liked how concise the summary was.

The first thing I wanted to do after reading this article was see who wrote it. I clicked the link, clicked the author's name, and found out that she has no relevant certification to the topic at hand. I know a degree doesn't automatically make you smarter than someone without one, but I guess it makes you look more credible on a first impression. I don't mean to attack her, I'm simply questioning her authenticity, but from the looks of it, she's a mother who enjoys writing. However, I can acknowledge the fact that she has a child with special needs, so maybe this treatment worked for her child. She could be biased though.

Also I find one of the premises vague. Your summary quotes the article which says, "“Hippotherapy is more effective than traditional therapies because horses have a unique ability to motivate children to try new things." Things... such as? This isn't really your fault, but perhaps if the quote listed some benefits I'd consider it.

One other thing, you use popularity to support the conclusion. You wrote, "In North Carolina, at Shining Hope Farms, there had been an addition of 50 children to the hippotherapy program in less than 3 month, some children are even on a waiting list because the demand has increased." Is this a premise, and if so, does it actually support your conclusion? The issue is whether or not hippotherapy works, not how popular it is. I could also argue that this is a red herring because it diverts from the issue at hand trying to make me think that hippotherapy works because some people are on a waiting list for it.

I'm sure hippotherapy has worked in some cases, but this article is a bit questionable. Anyways, like I said earlier, I really like how organized your points are. If you'd like to continue this or correct me on something I probably got wrong, please do.

Hi! I really like the subject of the article that you chose and I like that you decided to use a concise way to summarize it. However, as mustyanklesock said in the previous comment, the author does not seem to be certified about that subject. This makes me wonder what if there were a research done in order to get to the conclusion that hippotherapy helps children with special needs. There is no mention of the research methods whatsoever. In addition, I think that the conclusion should be justified or supported by a relevant figure of authority (other than only one physical therapist).
I would be really happy if you wanted to discuss your article or correct me on some points.

Hi. I found this summary very interesting and I really enjoyed learning about this topic since I had never heard about this form of physical therapy before! I also liked how concise your summary was. However, I did notice some points that we could discuss.

It has been brought to my attention that you used a hasty generalization as a premise. Indeed, the fifth premise reads that “each child is different and needs specific types of treatments in order for them to reach their goals.” which is completely logical. However, you then followed with “Hippotherapy can help them reach their goals faster, whether they be developmental, motor or speech goals.” As a counter example, I am sceptical about how kids who are perhaps scared of or allergic to horses would deal with this type of therapy. Therefore, if each child is different, how does this method help in every circumstance? Isn’t this premise contradictory?

Since I did not read the initial article, I may have misunderstood the fallacies mentioned above. Perhaps we could discuss the subject as well as your premises?

Hi,
I had literally never heard of hippotherapy treatments before reading your article, and now I'm fascinated by it. The way you presented this issue was great, and really got me hooked. However, I have a problem with your seventh premise. It seems to me that you proved one thing and concluded another. You wrote that there's been an addition of 50 people to the hippotherapy program at Shining Hope Farms, North Carolina, and there's been a huge increase in demands. That's great, but you've just proven that it's becoming very popular, not that it's benefitting anyone. That doesn't take away the fact that this is a very well crafted article, and that you did a tremendous job writing it.