mullerk's Genetics Class

SUNY Ulster
by laika24 on May 11, 2017
"Data sharing is key to the success of medical research, and participants in medical research are often those most eager to see their donation of data put to use.

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SUNY Ulster
by zsuperb1z on May 11, 2017
About cancer, everyone knows that this disease is about mutant cells and its spread through all body. However, there is an old research believes that there is another source can lead to cancer. It was called the epigenetic alteration. The study showed that "epigenetic changes – which don’t change the DNA sequence but how it is ‘read'." This issue does not change or mutate any gene in the DNA sequence, but it acts like a switch off to inactivate any particular gene; the gene is turned off  can affect to the function of other companies.

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SUNY Ulster
by Msoy on May 11, 2017
Altered HIV Gene Expression Leading to Faster CD4 Depletion  

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SUNY Ulster
by skyfogarty1265 on May 11, 2017
A study was performed on participants all born in the 90's. There were a total of 14,500 participants in the expirement done by The Univeristy of Bristol. The research found that if a girl's maternal grandmother had smoked during pregnancy, she was 67% more likely to display traits found in Autism like poor communication skills and repitive behavior. This disovery shows that if a female is exposed to cigarette smoke while still in the womb, it could affect the developg eggs.

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SUNY Ulster
by SchwerdtfegerK on May 10, 2017
Schizophrenia can be a tricky illness to define; not all symptoms are common from individual to individual, and even symptoms like hallucinations and delusions are not universal symptoms. The one correlation that can be found is the presence of Thought Disorder: the loss of logical thought processes that either allow the affected individual to make sense of their own thoughts, or keep their thoughts in a logical pattern and reason away ideas we could easily deem absurd.

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SUNY Ulster
by Cheungy55 on May 10, 2017
Hirschsprung disease affects the large intestine of newborns, babies, and todadlers. It can cause constipation, diarrhea, and vomiting and sometimes lead to serious colon complications, like enterocolitis and toxic megacolon, which can be life-threatening. Children who have Hirschsprung disease are missing those nerves along part of the length of their colons.

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SUNY Ulster
by klepeisj82 on May 9, 2017
Expression proteomics study to determine metallodrug targets and optimal drug combinations  

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SUNY Ulster
by epigene on May 9, 2017
Although statistics vary, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer mortality in the United States and is the 2nd leading cause of death in men and the 3rd leading cause in women (American Cancer Society, 2017).  At the forefront of colorectal cancer research is the study of the KRAS gene, which codes for proteins essential in regulating cell division.  When KRAS contains or acquires mutations, it becomes deregulated, like an on/off switch that can’t be turned off.  As a result, proteins essential for initiating growth factors, particularly epidermal growth factor (EGFR), are allow

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SUNY Ulster
by Burkem88Gentek on May 9, 2017
National Institutes of Health scientists have recognized a novel part for a quality known as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), finding that it is basic in tissue recovery and wound mending. The review found that topical treatment of a Hsp60-containing gel drastically quickens wound cessation in a diabetic mouse subject. The review likewise portrays the instrument by which this works, finding that Hsp60 protein is discharged at the site of damage, flagging injury mending to start.

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SUNY Ulster
by taytorchip on May 9, 2017
The article, “Spatial Assessment of Wolf-Dog Hybridization in a Single Breeding Period”, it talks about how studies on wolf-dog hybrids is becoming larger and larger. Saying how it is hard to do large sample data collecting due to the wide range of the packs. Because wolves and dogs share many traits it is hard for scientists to determine which genes to use to test DNA and separate the two. Because dogs and wolves have such similar characteristics, it is sometimes hard to tell the difference between a wolf, a dog, and a hybrid.

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SUNY Ulster
by hartwiga71 on May 9, 2017
Researcher did a study in December 21, 2016, which looked at was the cause of different parental care in individuals.

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SUNY Ulster
by rhiguita on May 9, 2017
Cloning, genetic engineering and characterization of TMOF expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to control larval mosquitoes  

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SUNY Ulster
by langm349 on May 7, 2017
It is well known that there is a current problem with obesity rates in America. It is also common to see a family where many of the members are overweight or obese. While an individual’s diet and activity level plays an important role in a person’s weight, a recent study has found that there may be a genetic factor involved.  Published in the journal Obesity, researchers found an association between obesity in African Americans and West Africans, and a genetic difference in the semaphorin-4D gene (SEMA4D).

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SUNY Ulster
by hartb52 on May 4, 2017
Brooke Hart Professor Muller BIO 206-01 Critique #3   Do Genes Play a Role in Parental Care of Monogamous Mice?   Figure 1: Peromyscus polionotus (Oldfield Mouse)  

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SUNY Ulster
by paisies on April 12, 2017
                Many things can cause someone to shake, quiver, have muscle spasms… too much caffeine, nerves, low blood sugar, but the thing that seems to always cross my mind is Huntington’s disease.  The classic and most well-known sign of Huntington’s disease is Chorea.  Chorea is abnormal, involuntary movements seen in patients at onset of 30 to 40 years of age.  This symptom is a telltale sign, but may also be miss diagnosing patients. 

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SUNY Ulster
by epigene on April 11, 2017
Sean Bigler BIO 206 April 11, 2017   Article:  http://www.nature.com/articles/srep42218   YOU HAVE TWO HOURS TO COMPLETE THE CALCULUS EXAM…LET’S BEGIN.  (Psst!.......Is your math anxiety heritable, environmental or a multifactorial construct?)  

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SUNY Ulster
by SchwerdtfegerK on April 9, 2017
Kianu Schwerdtfeger Kristin Muller Genetics 206 5 March 2017

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SUNY Ulster
by Msoy on April 6, 2017
Miles Soyer Genetics Critique Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell 4/4/17    

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SUNY Ulster
by laika24 on April 6, 2017
Venom systems have evolved on multiple occasions across the animal kingdom, and they can act as key adaptations to protect animals from predators [ 1 ]. Consequently, venomous animals serve as models for a rich source of mimicry types, as non-venomous species benefit from reductions in predation risk by mimicking the coloration, body shape, and/or movement of toxic counterparts [ 2–5 ]. The frequent evolution of such deceitful imitations provides notable examples of phenotypic convergence and are often invoked as classic exemplars of evolution by natural selection.

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7 months 3 days ago

the main idea with the fungus is that it would be more difficult for mosquitoes to respond to compared to viruses or sterilization as it would cause starvation amongst the larvae, resulting in lower chances for survival amongst the mosquitoes variants, but the main concern is how it affects other water born microbes and larvae.

7 months 4 days ago

I though this was a really cool article because it actually pairs really well with another student's article. Epigenetic alteration or modification is based on biochemical interactions caused by negative and positive feedback mechanisms which manipulate the synthesis of amino acids and the resulting conformation of polypeptides. All of the previously mentioned can have a drastic affect on gene expression in translation. Smoking is a prime example of a particular cause of an altered feedback mechanism which can affect gene expression and cause loss of control of cell growth which can eventually lead to cancer formation. Perhaps one of the ways we can study certain cancers, is by looking towards factors like smoking to understand how these habits affect our DNA and if the alterated gene expression can be corrected to prevent the formation of cancer.

7 months 4 days ago

"You can always choose your own actions, but you can never choose their consequences".

You know when they say, smoking contains a myriad of toxins, ranging in the several thousands, it is really startling to discover how these chemicals can affect up to two generations ahead. As of recently the number of worldwide smokers has diminished, but the most popular time to smoke has just past within the last 60-80 years. This could mean members of two generations could have been affected by smoking if was it was done during the maternal great grandmother's pregnancy. This could also suggest that smoking can indirectly manipulate a person's genetic code and that interference can be passed from mother to offspring. I wonder, does it show similar results for second hand smoke?

7 months 4 days ago

I do agree this is super interesting! Knowing that this protein can be yielded in such a way that it could be akin to something so common as a band aid provides relief as science advances. Having a grandma who suffered from diabetes, and as a result, many open wounds, this hits home because dressing those wounds and keeping the closest eye on them and the surrounding area was very difficult because of the nature of it; how susceptible it is to infection. I'm very glad this research is being done!

7 months 4 days ago

This is actually really neat because it opens up a whole new world in terms of treatment and prevention for a range of cancers! Like a molecule on a microvessel that can be injected into the body that targets the specific gene related to the cancer. Then it could be individualized to be more aggressive, hopefully fending off the cancer and any future cancers.

7 months 4 days ago

aids is one of the most mutatable virus in the world next to rhinovirus, also commonly known as the common cold, as it mutates to irreguraly to be permentaley cured or defended agains in the immune system.

7 months 4 days ago

It is amazing to find out all the harmful side affects that smoking has on the body, I never would of thought that it could play a factor in causing autism. Especially since you always hear people's concerns about vaccines causing autism when it could be something you encounter every day. I am also intrigued as to why it skips a generation and seems to only affect females.

7 months 4 days ago

This is fascinating research and another example of epigenetic influence on health of parents and their offspring. I just found an article entitled, “Cigarette Smoking and DNA methylation” (Lee & Pausova 2017). It links nicotine (as a carcinogen) and cancer. Also, our genetics class was just studying research whereby scientists ‘methylated’ the p16 gene, normally a tumor suppressor gene and made it a “methylation magnet.” This caused a higher incidence of spontaneous cancers in mice.

The carcinogens in cigarette smoke include: formaldehyde, chromium, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and arsenic. These ingredients must cause DNA damage and could cause a myriad of epigenetic diseases like cancer and…autism.

Lee, Ken W. K., and Zdenka Pausova. “Cigarette Smoking and DNA Methylation.” Frontiers in Genetics 4 (2013): 132. PMC. Web. 12 May 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3713237/

7 months 4 days ago

This seems like a very interesting study. I have also had family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer and it is devastating. I wasn't aware that it is the second leading cause of death in men. I hope that they continue their research and perhaps find another treatment for cancer.

7 months 4 days ago

I find this article interesting on multiple levels. Firstly, because I just so happen to be of European descent. And, secondly, because I also have a fascination with the human brain and how it works. We have traveled to space and landed on the moon, but don't understand the entirety of our own brains. Like many mental disorders and illnesses, we have little to no understanding on how they come about other than age seems to play a part, but not always. Hopefully, with more research into these similar SNPs, there can be a greater understanding into schizophrenia.

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