JURI 1106A Law as a Social Science

Algoma University
by keshav.vashist on December 2, 2015
We hear about law and society all the time, but what does it actually mean? We are surrounded by law. We’re also surrounded by social sciences. These social sciences include psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Its crucial to study social sciences when dealing with the law. We learn and observe how people work everyday, and those people encounter the law everyday. Social sciences have an affect on how we react to the law. An example would be: our psychological state. You’re in an upset, or not so good mood, you may decide to speed to work one day.

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Algoma University
by GillianMaskell on December 2, 2015
What is the benefit to studying law as a social science?

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Algoma University
by KailynMorrar on December 2, 2015
                It is difficult, and I would even argue impossible to encounter an academic discipline that is not an example of the law, however, prior to this semester I was naïve to the fact that law has a tremendous influence on everyday life. I did not put a lot of thought its relation to other subjects this until I began my history research essay on Witch Craft in Europe. Interestingly enough, courts and lawyers are not a recent phenomenon. Courts have been modifying what they think is best way is to attain justice, and solve disputes over a long and uneasy course of history.

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Algoma University
by rachiacoe on December 2, 2015
            The basis of a sociological interpretation of a specific society is that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. A society is interconnected groups of people with hierarchal power, institutions, and norms. The law itself is just the layout of the rules we are expected to follow. It encompasses direction, elective representatives, social control, enforcement, and expressions of power. In other words, the law is a formal expression of how a society is held together. It is a reflection and creation of different values.

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Algoma University
by carinnes on December 2, 2015
The benefit of studying law as a social science is it is a main part of society as a whole.  Sociology, political science, law, anthropology, and history are disciplines in the study of social sciences.  Social sciences focus on societies from the past and present.  Law controls actions, behaviours, and as members of society we are obligated to obey the law.  Law is one of the focuses of social sciences that govern its members of society.  Having the ability to understand how societies work and how the law impacts our lives on a daily basis.  By working together to improve the lives of memb

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Algoma University
by mdunn on December 2, 2015
There are many benefits to studying law as a social science.  When law is studied in a social science context it allows for one to see how law affects and is affected by society. Law may not necessarily change society fully as a whole, but it will have an impact on that way in which human beings behave. For example in class it was talked about how everyone under specific sections of the Charter have certain rights and freedoms. These rights and freedoms serve as a set of rules and rights towards the ways in which people should behave throughout society.

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Algoma University
by JustinBell on December 2, 2015
What is the benefit to studying law as a social science?             During this Semester, we learned a lot about how law affects society in JURI1106A. The benefit to studying law as a social science is that instead of just learning HOW the law works, we learn WHY it works and what its effects on society are. A few examples, drawing on the lectures from class, are the ideas of law, justice, power, obedience, authority, social control, and more.

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Algoma University
by itsdesola on December 2, 2015
Studying law as a social science Social science is the study human society and social relationships and one of the ways of defining law is as an expression of power, therefore law as a social science would be the study of how power shapes human society and regulates human relationships.

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Algoma University
by julieveilleux on December 2, 2015
What is the benefit to studying law as a social science?

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Algoma University
by aleexisautio on December 2, 2015
             When one looks at the over view of society, one can evidently see how hierarchy and control impacts every one’s life. Law influences every individual from the speed limit one drives, to putting the garbage out on a certain day to even how much taxes we pay on certain items. The law is evident in everything we, as citizens, do. By studying law as a social science you can look at how it effects each individual personally.

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Algoma University
by JoeyHodges on December 2, 2015
            There are many different aspects to the law and limiting the way we study it would also limit the understanding and knowledge we could extrapolate from our studies. Studying the law as a political science, in the sense that it’s just black on white and we learn the facts, is important because it aids us to keep social integrity and order, however, all it does is determine whether or not someone is guilty of a crime.

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Algoma University
by mikaylafahrer on December 2, 2015
Law and society are joined together and studying law as a social science is very beneficial. These concepts being studied together are considered as socio-legal studies. Coming from a socio-legal perspective is beneficial because society and law are inter -related. Laws are needed in order to keep society from becoming complete chaos. I believe that without the laws and the legal system enforcing these rules, society would not be able to function properly. As well as society acting on what the law enforces, the laws are also eligible to change based on the actions of society.

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Algoma University
by mgubesch2 on December 2, 2015
What is the benefit of studying law as a social science? 

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Algoma University
by sgiuliani on December 2, 2015
There are many benefits to studying law as a social science.  Studying law as a social science helps us see the material from a different point of view.  There are many categories that fall under social science and each one has a different way of viewing information.  For example, sociology studies the behaviour in a society.  Studying law this way is taking a socio-legal approach.  This approach views the codes and interprets the information to get the best understanding possible.  Socio-legal point of view is studying “everything but the law”.  It factors in the people involved, their per

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Algoma University
by lliguori on December 2, 2015
            Law as a social science is a study that is important for everyone to have at least a basic understanding of. One of the most important benefits of studying law as a social science is learning how the law impacts human behaviour. Some laws may not necessarily change society as a whole immediately, but it does have an effect on how people view the world. For example, the Somerset case changed people’s outlook on slavery and helped determine what rights slaves were supposed to be entitled to. However, the ruling didn’t abolish slavery.

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Algoma University
by marleeb on December 1, 2015
            There are many benefits to studying law as a social science. Studying law as a social science gives people a different perspective on law in our society. Incorporating law with social science displays “everything but the rules”. Law plays a role in how people interact in society. As mentioned in class sessions, “law is a governmental social control”. Law shows society what you can and cannot do. Without the law, people would not be sure about what is a normal and abnormal thing to do in society.

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Algoma University
by jpatterson on December 1, 2015
Studying law as a social science has many benefits. Rather than just study past cases and laws, studying it as a social science explains how it affects society and how society also affects the law. One of the benefits to studying law as a social science is understanding how law is used to maintain a functioning society. Laws state what actions are legal within society and what actions may result in legal repercussions. This knowledge can be used in court rooms or can be used in simpler everyday activities when determining whether something can legally be done or not.

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Algoma University
by flames19 on December 1, 2015
The benefit of studying law as a social science has many benefits. When studying law as a social science, it shows the reasons of why we must obey the laws in our society. We obey the laws in our society which is a benefit as a social science because it shows that the laws are them to protect anyone regardless of what they did. Studying law as a social science is a benefit because social science opens up many debates and shape our society and our futures, it gives many opportunities for us to control our own future.

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Algoma University
by AndrewLuck12 on December 1, 2015
There are many benefits of studying law as a social science. By studying law as a social science, we can see law from a different point of view. Studying law as a social science allows us to observe how people, and ourselves react under law. For example, we can look at statistics of how many people were speeding or even how many people committed crimes of murder under certain periods of time when laws were different then they are now. With those statistics, we can also examine how many people that were male or female committed those crimes.

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Reply to: Blog Post #1
4 years 6 months ago

Wow! I didn't think that someone could write so much about law, given that we are in a law class, btw comments were due today, so I gave you the most useful feedback I could.

Reply to: Blog Post #2
4 years 6 months ago

Hey, I just came from post #3 and found out that infact, this blog also had to do with law! How amazing!

Reply to: Blog Post #3
4 years 6 months ago

Wow, good job, this law assignment really contained stuff about the law.

Reply to: Blog Post #2
4 years 6 months ago

Your post brought similar points to mine when considering that people obey the law because of their morals and their fear of punishment. Most of us like to think we obey the law as much as we can because it is our political obligation. The idea of disobeying the law has been encompassed under civil disobedience. There are a number of different approaches we have seen to how people go about showing that they do not agree with certain laws. One of which is protest. We go about an action like protest when we want to turn attention to another action. However, there are several laws that have been enacted to ensure that disobedience is as controlled as possible. Going back to the example of protest, there are forms of protest that are made legal under the Charter. Some of which highlight we can only assemble in a way that is non-violent, and the police can detain or limit the actions if it is justified democratically. As mentioned in your post, we all have different views of laws and that’s why words and interpretations are important factors. Even when we don’t agree we are expected to serve society with our conscience and communicate effectively.

Reply to: blog post 3
4 years 6 months ago

Your post gave me a new way of thought of how we should use society to come up with prevention strategies when it comes to broken laws. Thinking proactively instead of reactively is a very efficient approach. You have also brought in ideas of how a sociological perspective has brought us several explanations to the functions of the world we know today. It immediately made me think of The Living Tree and the interpretation it gives of the Constitution as a living thing that adjusts with social values. However I would just like to add the important fact that society not only affects the law but the law in turn affects society. For example, people use the Charter to challenge violations of rights often in the courtroom. We see the relationship between society and law like in the case of Keegstra. He argued that his freedom of expression was violated which came to agreeance with the Charter and therefore a societal value. However he did not win his case because of another law, specifically 319 (2), showed that is actions were unreasonable. It is important to not forget that law and society have significant influences on each other it is not just a unidirectional relationship.

Reply to: Blog Post #2
4 years 6 months ago

Drawing on the first half of your post, I admire your arguments and ideas of why people follow the law and I agree that punishment is an extremely large part in the deterrence of crime, however, I don’t believe it is the sole factor. Of course knowing that you will get punished for doing something if you get caught will make you think twice about it before acting, however, there’s rarely only one cause for something. What’s the explanation for someone abiding by the law when they don’t yet know the punishment? Children at a young age have not yet learned what punishments will be attributed to what actions or even that there will be any punishments at all, yet they aren’t all going around breaking laws. This same effect can be seen in adults, though it is less common that an adult will still not be aware of punishment through the law. Perhaps they are traveling abroad where the law is approached differently, this change of law means that they don’t necessarily know what actions might get punished, but they will still not go around breaking what they think will be the laws.
This type of behaviour among people demonstrates that the knowledge of a punishment is not the only thing influencing people to follow the law, it is also personal reflection and morality. It may be a small part of why people abide by the law, so small that often people will disregard it or not even think of it in the first place. Nevertheless, in my opinion, it is still to be considered as part of the reason of why societies and individuals follow the law.

Reply to: 2/3
4 years 6 months ago

You raise the point that in Canada we don’t face much chaos because of a more structured governmental system and thus this shows that we don’t have many people breaking laws. Presumably what you mean by chaos is things like mass shootings every second day and terrorist attacks or revolutionary wars spread across the country, in which case I agree completely. This doesn’t mean however that there aren’t rampant crimes occurring in Canada and even within the government itself. Typically the crimes seen on the news are ones that cause significant damage to a person, place or group and will have repercussions large enough to have possible international effects. We don’t often hear about the many crimes going on in our own country because they’re what are referred to as “white-collar crimes”, commit by upper class people, typically businessmen or politicians. We don’t hear about these crimes much, not only because people aren’t always directly or physically harmed by them, but also because these people are in positions of power, like in the government, and have the mean to cover up the crimes. People are also more hesitant to accuse them of something of pursue them as criminals, due to possible intimidation because of their power. We see more and more of these crimes coming to light, which shows that not all crime causes chaos or even enough tremor to make it onto the news.
All in all, what I’m trying to say is even if people don’t follow the law, it doesn’t mean that there will be chaos, and even if nobody really hears about it, it doesn’t mean people aren’t breaking the law. Thus, there must be another reason why people follow the law, other than simply to avoid chaos.

Reply to: Blog post 3
4 years 6 months ago
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Reply to: Blog Post Two
4 years 6 months ago

Thanks Marissa for this article, there are many reasons why people obey the law which is carefully explained by you, In addition the part where you discuss the acceptability of the law, it is true that people are only bound to obey the law if it reflects common values and beliefs held by society and also part of what makes up a law is acceptability, if the law is not accepted by people in the society, it cannot be obeyed. And for a law to be rejected there will be acts of protests, involving petitions and creating awareness for representatives, also the law does adjust to reflect the changing nature of society, for example, the rights of homosexuals to get married was not popular until about a couple of years ago this shows a way that the law adjusts based on changes and development of societal values this changes are sometimes contested by other individuals but these only helps to show the power that law has over individuals

Reply to: Blog Post #1
4 years 6 months ago

This is a very informative article Mallory, It is true that the law is a process and that there are some laws you cannot access until certain ages, like getting your drivers license or having access to purchasing alcohol and you incorporated the way that the law evolves every time society develops and this makes us as citizens to conform with these laws and they shape our lives. Also in addition to your comment of the visible aspect of law that there are law enforcement agencies around us, like court and police stations, put there to monitor us and they are also a form of social control because there may not be officers present at all times in a police station but the crime rate where these stations are located will be very low because of the presence of building, this way the law acts as a form of indirect social control.

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