CMC 243: Radio and Television Writing

About this class

CMC 243 is an introductory course in writing for electronic media, concentrated on radio, TV and Internet news, commercials and public service announcements.With the successful completion of this course, students will have written promotional copy, news copy, advertising copy, and feature copy, in short, a representative sampling of writing styles used and in some cases required by contemporary media industries. This course provides opportunity to collect material for a professional portfolio and to prepare for potential internships and job applications. Extensive time will be spent viewing, writing, re-writing, and listening to copy within the course.

SUNY Brockport
by ncori1 on November 17, 2016
Invasive Species Radio Script  Niko: Hey this is Niko coming to you from Brockport NY to bring you a special news story. Niko: Many people don’t know about the controversial topic of invasive species. Niko: Now for the people who don’t know what an invasive species is; it’s basically a species that has been introduced in a place separate from its natural habitat through humans. Niko: Here in New York there is a legal penalty for chopping down an ash tree. But why is that?

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SUNY Brockport
by NewsCowboy43 on November 3, 2016
James Yaw CMC 243-61 Radio TV Writing   James: Live from NPR news in Washington I’m James Yaw. Air quality is becoming a global issue, as a recent report by Canadian news has found that China tops the World Health Organization’s list for deadliest outdoor air pollution with a shocking 1 million deaths last year, which accounts for one-third of total deaths worldwide. William Clarke, biology major at Guelph University, has more.  

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SUNY Brockport
by gshep on November 2, 2016
SOUND: THUNDER STRIKE WITH RAIN APPROACHING. ESTABLISH AND FADE UNDER   ANNCR:

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SUNY Brockport
by leochai219 on November 2, 2016
Ocean Acidification (Intro Music: 30 sec long) Leo:  Hey guys, my name is Leo Chai, host of Nature’s Radio Podcast and       today we will be having a special guest.  Harriet Minc, a biology student from Guelph University,  who is here to answer questions about her research on Ocean      Acidification.           Harriet:            Hi, great to be here today           Leo: Alright, nice to have you here.

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by Scally p on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
Fracking Up Our Planet?

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by lgriffin on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
        In no longer than a month, the federal government must make a decision whether to follow through with the plan of a pipeline extension from Alberta to the B.C. coast. More specifically, it is expanding Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain Pipeline between these areas. There are many factors that will determine the final decision on carrying out these plans including the environmental risks of spills and the increase in emissions of greenhouse gases. The federal government must have the positive impacts outweighing the negative in order to allow for the continuation of this project.

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by leafitalone on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
On October 7th, 2016, The Calgary Herald released a news article on its website regarding a 3-hectare oil spill in Northern Alberta. The leak occurred about 15km away from a town called Fox Creek, covering a flowing marsh area “which isn’t home to fish”. Glad that’s cleared up. The Alberta Energy Regulator is said to be investigating the extent of the environmental damage, and an emergency cleanup process has been initiated.

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by Allison on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
As discussed in the article Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters Repelled by Force at Bridge Crossing, there is currently a significant amount of conflict in the region of North Dakota mainly between the government whose actions are represented by law enforcement and an indigenous community. This stems from the native reserve of the Standing Rock Sioux protesting a pipeline that is being built near their reserve as there is fear of contamination of their water supply.

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by Acotter on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
2016 and a Liberal swinging government have provided the political equivalent of a subtweet aimed at the archaic ways in which our government includes the public in policy making decisions regarding climate action. The purpose of this article is to question the Liberal governments creation of an online forum for engaging a large section of the Canadian population including industry members, NGO’s, environmental groups, the private sector and the public at large.

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by Acotter on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
2016 and a Liberal swinging government have provided the political equivalent of a subtweet aimed at the archaic ways in which our government includes the public in policy making decisions regarding climate action. The purpose of this article is to question the Liberal governments creation of an online forum for engaging a large section of the Canadian population including industry members, NGO’s, environmental groups, the private sector and the public at large.

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by LK1013 on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
An article called, the “Impact of Muskrat Falls a Nova Scotia Problem, Protesters Say” by Rachel Ward of CBC news, touched on the ongoing dispute between Nova Scotia's Energy Department and environmentalists, indigenous groups, and citizen’s scientists who are worried about methylmercury leaking into the nearby watershed of the Happy Valley-Goose Bay area. Protestors are insisting that proper precaution procedures should be implemented to ensure that the reservoirs remain uncontaminated.

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by chauvin.m on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
An article in CBC News by Paul Withers discusses a new tidal turbine that has been installed in the Bay of Fundy that is now delivering electricity to 500 homes. Initially, this seems to be great news, because Canada needs to increase its use of renewable energy in order to uphold our part of the Paris Agreement and investing in tidal energy is a good option as three oceans border Canada, providing easy access to a renewable resource. However, this may be more complex than simply installing turbines and letting them generate electricity.

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by dylan.grieve on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
Every day we make decisions in our lives that can either leave an impact on the environment or not. Businesses and media tell us how we can lower these environmental impacts every day. We can swap out light bulbs, take shorter showers, buy eco labeled foods, turn off AC and heating when we are not home, and support local businesses. What if all these environmentally friendly initiatives and consumer goods are doing enough? What if by simply cutting down on our meat consumption to follow the recommended health food guidelines could cut emissions by nearly a third by 2050.

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by carlythrasher on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
“Duunn duunn…duuuuuun duunn… dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun “We have all experienced the sinking feeling hearing the two notes that have made us scared of swimming pools, oceans and lakes. The 1975 blockbuster Jaws spiked the worldwide irrational fear and hatred towards sharks. Since then, multiple films and TV shows have amplified such fear, making sharks vulnerable and targeted for commercial fishing.  The radio clip by CBC’s Matt Galloway describes this spike in commercial fishing, specifically drawing in on the shark fin trade and its inhumane tactics.

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by cmajor_1 on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
According to an article about the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) meeting in Portugal, Canada has made “the right decision” over fishing quotas. The ICCAT is charged with the conservation of tunas and tuna-like species in the Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent seas.

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by McTeeg on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
It comes as no surprise that many Canadian provinces have and continue to rely on coal-fire power generation. It’s also not news that Ontario has recently managed to go coal free as part of their initiative to reduce emissions and move towards renewable power sources. However, as great as this is from an environmental perspective it has come at a cost, specifically in the form of expensive hydro bills.

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by andrewsd on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
  Make Muskcat Right  

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by Thor06 on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
The article “Standing Rock pipeline protesters repelled by force at bridge crossing” written by The Associated Press aims to inform the public on the increasing tensions associated with the construction of the $3.8 billion “Dakota Access” pipeline in Standing Rock Indian reserve adjacent to their primary source of water. The Dakota Access pipeline is expected to carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois which will eventually reach its destination to Gulf of Mexico.

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by oneillp on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
Article of Discussion: World leaders wage into water to fight climate change Author: Bob McDonald   Until The Last Drink of Water!

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by efortush on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
     Oceanic contamination throughout the world is one of the largest issues pertaining to water degradation, and is now a large threat to the Canadian Pacific Coast.  Specifically, introduction of algal blooms to coastal areas can be attributed to being a large portion of the threat to the environment, various species and human life. The article titled “Climate change could foster toxic algae along Pacific coast, says report” encompasses the growing risks related to the Canadian BC pacific coastline as well as its relationship towards the nearby harmful Alaska blooms.

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by tatertot on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
     As reported by Cameron (2016), at about one kilometre away from the Lake Huron shoreline, stands the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station that is owned by the Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Over time, as a result of generating nuclear power, they have developed waste products that have been classified as low-level and intermediate radioactive waste.

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by aseth on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
The recent discovery of another source of oil in Texas has sparked the conversation about the increased need for pipelines in Canada. The new Texas formation, known as the Wolfcamp formation, contains an estimated 20 billion barrels of oil, 16 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.6 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. While this is not expected to have a huge effect on oil prices, it is still noteworthy for the Albertan and Canadian government.

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by kohearn on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
This May, Canadians and people around the world were shocked by the wildfire that tore through Fort McMurray, Alberta, leaving almost 80,000 people homeless and resulting in immense economic and social consequences. Most people saw the fire as an event that could never have been predicted, and it highlighted the importance of disaster readiness for communities at risk from wildfires.

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5 years 1 month ago

Hey Andrew!

Thanks so much for your post. I think you did a great job in addressing a pressing issue for Canadian's, being the reliance on the non-renewable energy source of fossil fuels as a means of government revenue and energy production. It is without a doubt that Canada is currently extracting oil from tar sands and other forms of oil reserves in Western Canada and will continue to for some time, based on the contracts that have been established with China. However, I do think in spite of this we are doing a good job or reducing our ecological footprint in smaller sections of Canada.

For instance, Ontario has pledged to shut down all of the Nuclear power plants in the next 20 years. Even though Wynne has invested billions of dollars into the refurbishment of our Nuclear power plants, it is a step in the right direction that we have a set timeline for closure.

Canada is a great country, and even though our government doesn't make the best decisions 100% of the time, I think it is important to acknowledge that we need to make deals for our resources in order to establish some sort of presence in the international economy. Look on the bright side :)

Thanks again,

Davis

5 years 1 month ago

I have recently become really interested in the issue of corporations extracting fresh water and selling it to consumers. Water should be a public resource, not sold off for private profit. With this being said, the tittle of your blog captured my attention and it also gave myself an interesting question to reflect on. The fact that Nestle wants to renew a permit which allows them to withdrawal one million liters of water for $3.71, is outrageous. What is even more outrageous than Nestles plan to renew a permit is the fact that the company got the permit in the first place, as it obviously is not in the best interest for citizens. I also wanted to mention that you did a great job summarizing the article, which is great so that more people can hopefully get involved in this issue! I also liked the fact that you related the article to the different types of conflict. I agree that this issue is an example of interest conflict, mainly because there is no firm agreement regarding who should pay for the costs over the water scarcity issue. Another type of conflict which can be related to this issue is behavioral conflict, due to the fact that there is a historical relationship of the state not looking out for its people, and putting corporations first.

One question I have for you is: Where do you think this issue falls on the issue awareness cycle?

5 years 1 month ago

cstew92,

I was drawn to your post because this is a topic i'm not very familiar with. I never really considered that greenhouse gas emissions could come from wastewater. You delivered the information with extreme clarity and really demonstrated that you are very knowledgeable on this topic. I liked how you highlighted the fact that this is a good example of uncertainty in resource management. Managing the human impacts on natural resources is extremely difficult, but like you said, decisions need to be made anyway.

It is concerning that the IPCC, a panel tasked with documenting causes of climate change, would omit such a large factor of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater. Whether it was intentional or unintentional, it raises concerns about who is in charge of this huge responsibility. This definitely emphasizes that more regulation is needed when it comes to precious resources such as water. If we wish to truly combat climate change, it's crucial that we have a thorough understanding of the impacts of our actions.

5 years 1 month ago

Hey Milana,

I think the topic of nuclear power is an interesting subject, and your article got me thinking. There are two ways to look at this situation. On one side, you must be able to appreciate the magnificent ingenuity of mankind and our ability to harness the power of natural elements derived from our planet. The ability for scientists to apply theoretical concepts to physically and chemically alter specific elements to provide energy for humans is simply astonishing to me. On the other hand, you can also see evidence of the devastation that this type of energy produces. Major implications for the environment pose serious threats to many aspects of human life as the toxic remains of this process are either not disposed of properly or manage to leak into the environment through a variety of human or climatic factors. I personally think the biggest problem with the production of nuclear energy is one that we have yet to fully experience or notice just yet. The decay process for active nucleic atoms can take thousands of years, and with disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima being relatively recent on that timescale, availability for long-term scientific studies on the effects of radiation cannot adequately provide the necessary information needed. I agree with you that going forward, nuclear power may not be a viable option much longer. Although, we must also consider that this type of energy is currently relied upon as a vital source of power to areas all over the globe and so transitioning away from this source will have its complications. That is not to say however that it should not be done.

Cheers,

Cam

5 years 1 month ago

Hello,
Thank you for your feedback. For some reason I am unable to access the website you've provided. With regards to your question about the assumption made by the IPCC, if you re-read the first paragraph it might make it a bit more clear as to why the IPCC chose to omit emissions caused by wastewater. As you may know, The IPCC is in charge of providing various kinds of scientific data to decision makers and so when they produce estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions - things like fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and other industrial and agricultural activities are included. However, the study in which this article relates to determined that the IPCC completely ignored the thought of CO2 emissions from wastewater treatment facilities because they assumed that any carbon released was due to biological processes (like human waste) which is carbon neutral. The problem with this is that household items like detergents, soaps, etc., contain specific chemicals that when processed during treatment are not always contained 100%. Therefore, this study suggests the IPCC neglected to account for nearly 23% of total greenhouse gas emissions in their estimates. As you can see this poses huge implications for decisions going forward, and also raises doubt as to whether or not those who are in charge of data collection are capable of this position.

Here is a copy to another article I found that discusses the same study and might provide more information for you.
http://www.climatecentral.org/news/sewage-plants-overlooked-co2-source-2...

Cheers!

5 years 1 month ago

Hello jessieparlee great post. The rising concerns regarding the Sioux Nation and the North Dakota pipeline has become one of the most prominent environmental issues regarding today’s conflict scenarios. The entire conflict displays the many issues regarding past aboriginal relationships, land rights, and state resource management. The unbelievable way that the state treats the protest has been absolutely disturbing besides the lack of recognition of aboriginal rights and fresh water concerns. The implementation of the Dakota Access pipeline poses a large amount of risk towards essential resources used and consumed by the Sioux First Nationals people as well as many other citizens.
The protest and support for this concern is absolutely essential in achieving recognition from the state on the importance of our natural resources and environmental health. The state should idealistically be looking towards more viable resources than crude oil in the first place, rather than introducing a massive environmental risk such as this pipeline. Support locally and around the world will aid in achieving a more beneficial result from this massive issue/event and hopefully lead to greater aboriginal rights and recognition. Economic gain should not be put ahead of citizen health and environmental concern. Overall great post and ultimately hope to hear more beneficial results regarding the Dakota Access pipeline in the future.

5 years 1 month ago

Dear Author,
I'd like begin by saying that this article is very informative and incorporates the definition of renewable resources in a great way for the reader to understand the significance of exceeding the threshold and potentially relegating renewable resources to stock resources. I'd also like to point out that by incorporating a personal touch, "the son of a wastewater treatment operator" you convey the blog with a sense of confidence to the reader that you have enough knowledge to understand the impacts that wastewater emission have. On the other hand you only mention that the IPCC omitted the emission caused by wastewater, is there a specific reason? You suggest they "used assumptions" when omitting these datum from emission reports, as a reader I don't know what "assumptions" they are using to neglect this information.
Below I have provided a link that briefly describes reasons why data are omitted in some cases.
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-leslie-costs-and-benefits-del...
Overall it was a fantastic blog and I really enjoy the personal touch that you added to it!

5 years 1 month ago

Hey AsimSayMo,

First off I would like to commend for a very well written blog post, which addresses such a pressing national and global issue! Like Ontario, heavy coal-reliant provinces need to pull their weight if Canada wants to meet the national emissions target set in the Paris Agreement. Yes, energy is an important aspect of Canada’s economy, but I don’t fully agree with some of the arguments that were mentioned in the article. Eradicating coal powered plants may have a negative effect on the economy, however investing in renewable sources of energy will create many new sectors and opportunities for employment as a result.

In 2015, Alberta implemented their Climate Leadership plan, outlining the ban of coal by 2030, and the creation of a carbon tax; proposed to reach $30/tonnes by 2018 and be completely revenue neutral. Revenue neutral plans mean that the revenue from this tax will go right back into the province by being allocated toward lowering income tax or converted to the form of rebates. This transition will lead to a decrease of jobs in one sector but an increase in many others. Initially it may affect the workers and power bills, but it will be far more beneficial for people’s health, the environment, and ultimately our future economy.

This idea of renewable energy being social and economically regressive, is what will ruin the state of our environment and destroy the livelihood of Canadians in the future. Eliminating coal as a source of energy will allow renewable energy to flourish, and provide a healthy environment for Canadians. Ultimately diversifying the economy and creating progressive taxes, will help families adapt to this shift in change.

Sources

http://www.alberta.ca/climate-coal-electricity.aspx

http://www.alberta.ca/climate-leadership-plan.aspx

5 years 1 month ago

Hi blackpanther,
I really enjoyed your article. I also wrote on the same topic but from a different article, so it was good to see a slightly different approach to the topic. I defintely agree that the park should be there especially since in the surrounding context, the area is quite grey and devoid of natural spaces - mainly filled with parking lots. It will provide recreational opportunities and can be ecologically beneficial. On the other hand, I have read that there is a concern for a lack of parking spaces, especially with the new Rogers Place that was built in the area that did not provide many parking spaces (there hope was to use adjacent parking areas). There was also concern from citizens, found in the facebook comments of my article, that commuters to the downtown area would have less places to park and public transit isn't exactly efficient in Edmonton to allow them to easily get downtown. What would your approach or solution be to address these other concerns against the park?

Thanks for sharing!
-Elle

5 years 1 month ago

Great post! As someone who has lived in several National Parks, I really enjoyed reading this and hearing about the visitors who rate preservation and development and equally important. I think that development is a controversial topic to people who live in or near a park and are in the environment of the park often. It is disturbing to see some of the natural elements of a park taken away. I think it’s also important to keep in mind that a lot of visitors are coming to see a pristine, undisturbed natural environment, and with the continuous development of parks, this sought-after aspect could be tainted. I also loved that you supplied alternate ideas for attracting visitors in your article- this supported your opinion of the issue. I would be intrigued to hear more research surrounding park attendance and development- has increased development had any correlation with increasing number of visitors?

SUNY Genesee Community Colllege

University of Guelph

  • Management of the Biophysical Environment - 2016

    This course examines the role of the state in environmental issues. We examine the rationales, challenges and pitfalls inherent in state-led resource management. Students will be blogging on media coverage of important environmental issues throughout the course of the semester.

About the author

I am an Senior Instructional Designer working in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at the College at Brockport, State University of New York. I also am an adjunct faculty member, teaching in both the Communications and Education Department.

Institution

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