CMC 243: Radio and Television Writing

About this class

CMC 243 is an introductory course in writing for electronic media, concentrated on radio, TV and Internet news, commercials and public service announcements.With the successful completion of this course, students will have written promotional copy, news copy, advertising copy, and feature copy, in short, a representative sampling of writing styles used and in some cases required by contemporary media industries. This course provides opportunity to collect material for a professional portfolio and to prepare for potential internships and job applications. Extensive time will be spent viewing, writing, re-writing, and listening to copy within the course.

SUNY Brockport
by ncori1 on November 17, 2016
Invasive Species Radio Script  Niko: Hey this is Niko coming to you from Brockport NY to bring you a special news story. Niko: Many people don’t know about the controversial topic of invasive species. Niko: Now for the people who don’t know what an invasive species is; it’s basically a species that has been introduced in a place separate from its natural habitat through humans. Niko: Here in New York there is a legal penalty for chopping down an ash tree. But why is that?

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SUNY Brockport
by NewsCowboy43 on November 3, 2016
James Yaw CMC 243-61 Radio TV Writing   James: Live from NPR news in Washington I’m James Yaw. Air quality is becoming a global issue, as a recent report by Canadian news has found that China tops the World Health Organization’s list for deadliest outdoor air pollution with a shocking 1 million deaths last year, which accounts for one-third of total deaths worldwide. William Clarke, biology major at Guelph University, has more.  

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SUNY Brockport
by gshep on November 2, 2016
SOUND: THUNDER STRIKE WITH RAIN APPROACHING. ESTABLISH AND FADE UNDER   ANNCR:

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SUNY Brockport
by leochai219 on November 2, 2016
Ocean Acidification (Intro Music: 30 sec long) Leo:  Hey guys, my name is Leo Chai, host of Nature’s Radio Podcast and       today we will be having a special guest.  Harriet Minc, a biology student from Guelph University,  who is here to answer questions about her research on Ocean      Acidification.           Harriet:            Hi, great to be here today           Leo: Alright, nice to have you here.

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by dcarroll on December 5, 2016
University of Guelph
National Geographic addresses multiple issues in One of the World’s Biggest Fisheries is on the Verge of Collapse. The two biggest being natural resource governance, and conflict over open-access resources. The environmental issue at hand being fisheries over-extracting fish stock in the South China Sea, where 10 countries and territories surrounding the South China Sea extract stock in order to support their economies, as well as their need for fish to support the hunger of many.

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by breanne on November 29, 2016
University of Guelph
            Climate change seems to have our undivided attention as its effects span every cultural, social, and economic reach of our earth’s populace. In a nutshell, carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere resulting from anthropogenic activity has initiated the rapidly accelerated warming of temperatures globally. We hear through the media on a regular basis, just how imperative it is that we halt the rise before it exceeds unrecoverable levels and drastic changes begin to occur in every facet of the environment.

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by mcaponci on November 29, 2016
University of Guelph
With climate change at the forefront of most environmental discussions, scientists have taken it upon themselves to seek out a viable path forward towards achieving our climate targets by 2050. Clean energy and a move towards decarbonization has been distinguished as the most urgent task. Scientists conclude that through the use in nuclear power, whole civilizations can be powered and carbon emissions can be dramatically lowered. Nuclear power is being characterized as environmentally advantageous in comparison to alternative for of energy.

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by vquach94 on November 28, 2016
University of Guelph
The Pacific Northwest LNG project was announced in 2013; a $36 billion gas project that’s an extension of the Petronas Company. It would export 19 million tons a year of liquefied gas to markets in Asia, while contributing more than 5 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, annually. This project would be beneficial to Canada’s economy and as such, the Liberals have granted approval, alongside the federal government of British Columbia, who has granted conditional approval of the LNG project.

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by Cped101 on November 28, 2016
University of Guelph
National Parks: The Pressures of Development http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/thenational/national-parks-pressure-1.3797434

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by nchis_1 on November 28, 2016
University of Guelph
The decline of marine species is having troubling affects on fisheries around the world. In an interview with marine biologist Dr. Worm, Mike Adams uses his expert opinions and recommendations to document the issue in greater depth. The article and interview covers the problem of commercial fishing of every corner of our planets oceans, with many of the fisheries now failing. During the interview, Dr. Worm exaggerated how unsustainable the sea life population is as a leading food source of the world.

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by ao1sc on November 26, 2016
University of Guelph
One of the planet’s largest ecosystems is brewing in controversy: is manmade pollution impacting the oceans?  Recent studies have shown that marine degradation is rapidly accelerating with thousands of tons of waste such as sewage, oil, chemicals, and mostly plastic, entering the oceans every day creating trash vortexes. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the largest of all and spans from Japan to the West Coast of the United States.

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by samanthacasey on November 26, 2016
University of Guelph
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Times New Roman'; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} span.s1 {font-kerning: none}

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by Andrew1262 on November 26, 2016
University of Guelph
The concept of alternative energy has been growing in discussion over the last few years, and has given concern to many modern energy use concerns and how they link to other issues such as climate change. The topic has created a separation of many manager opinions regarding the use of energy, and this is especially so with Ontario. In recent years Ontario has cooperated with the fight against climate change with the construction of numerous wind farms and solar energy panels throughout Ontario.

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by Philly Dias on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
A little over a year ago, the Albertan government implemented the Climate Leadership Plan, a new mitigation tactic to transition away from harmful forms of energy, and promote the growth of their oil industry. With the impacts of global warming at an all time high, Alberta needed to take preventive measures of their resources, while still allowing for their staple economy to thrive. Alberta as a state, must strive to sustainably manage their resources whilst promoting economic growth, sustaining job security, and planning goals to protect their residents and the surrounding environment.

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by elle_wing on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
Cover: Location of Proposed Park in downtown Edmonton. (Taken from Google Maps on 25 November 2016)

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by jessieparlee on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
In summary, the piece of media which has been selected is regarding the protest against the North Dakota Pipeline in Standing Rock Sioux Nation. Thousands of people have now displayed their support with the first nation community. Protests, marches and rallies have also taken place all over Canada, as a way to display solidarity. Standing Rock Sioux Nation is opposed to the construction of a multi-million dollar project that would transport crude oil from the Bakken oil field, close to the border of Saskatchewan Canada, into the border of Illinois.

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by Andi_T_de on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
The article “Markham opens Canada’s 1st Municipal milkweed nursery” is an example of how local initiatives can aid in conservation. The goal of the city of Markham is to increase the number of milkweed plants available for the monarch butterflies as they migrate from Mexico back to Canada. The individuals involved in the project are the City of Markham’s mayor Frank Scarpitti, council members, the David Suzuki Foundation and the students from St. Patrick’s elementary school (David Suzuki Foundation, 2016). The nursery is located at the Milne Dam Conservation Park.

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by koalabear on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
For decades our society has been constantly urbanizing, turning untouched land into skyscrapers and sub-divisions.  We are constantly attached to technology and glued to what’s going to happen next on social media. What if everyone took a step back and remembered what used to make most of us so happy when we were younger? Playing outside!! After researching the effects of how being outside affects mental and physical health; it’s evident that going outdoors has many positive benefits

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by rrazak on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
Coal consumption is one of the dirtiest of all the fossil fuels that threaten our environment and health. Yet, the aritcle titled Phasing out coal: good for the environment, bad for your wallet by Global News seems to solely focus on the economical disadvantages of phasing out coal. 

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by AsimSayMo on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
Original Article by John Paul Tasker, CBC News: Canada's rejection of coal will clear the air but impact workers and power bills

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by cehlert on November 25, 2016
University of Guelph
An article from Food Safety News entitled: Oceana going overboard on fish fraud, according to seafood industry group, introduced a recent study conducted by Oceana, a global environmental group, that brought to light a recent fish fraud study. The fraud found was that 58% of samples from restaurants, stores and other retail outlets in over 55 countries were labeled as higher valued species of fish, when they were really lesser valued species of fish. What is worse is that in some cases the mislabeled fish posed health risks to consumers as well.

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12 months 4 days ago

Hey hlvolpe,

I thought your post was really intersting. As someone who has dealt with the special education school system in Ontario, I feel that you did a good job of outlining its shortcomings. Personally, I found that I wasn't engaged enough in many of my classes during primary and secondary school and so ended up being labeled a problematic student by teachers due to my acting out. This was unfortunate to say the least. Anyway, I really enjoyed reading about this as it has affected me personally. Great Job!!!

Thanks,

NewsBot

12 months 4 days ago

Good Post AJ,

I thought this was really interesting and that you did a great job of outlining the issue. I thought that you had a good use of descripitive language and that you're writing style really helped to grab the readers attention. I thought you were very informative in your discussion regarding the risks of vaccinating versus not vaccinating. I think that I would definitely vaccinate my child.

Cheers,

Newsbot

1 year 16 hours ago

Hey gymkata98,

I’m not offended by your comment, but I want to unpack some of your arguments. It sounds to me like the training here is the issue, not your fiancée’s capabilities. She hasn’t been trained to deal with cases where she will be physically weaker than an attacker, and that’s a shortcoming of the police force training rather than an inherent weakness. By compromising the reality of drills like her Defense Tactics test, she’s certainly not getting the skills she needs to deal with these situations when they arise on the job. Unfortunately, you seem to see this as a woman problem and not a training problem.

You said you have 7 years of martial arts training and a year of Jujitsu - if you took a random man off the street and went through the same drills you went through with your fiancée, I think it’s unlikely that man would be able to overpower you either. You simply have better training honed through practice. When she was on her first call, and the male cop with her was able to subdue a 19 year old man, do you really think that 19 year old was on the same level of skill as the male cop? No, the cop has better training and because training in the police force was tailored towards men, he was able to get a favourable outcome.

Applying cookie cutter techniques to training, especially in a dangerous profession like the police force, is a recipe for injuries and death for those trained improperly. I absolutely agree that police officers should have partners at all times, but women should especially be trained for situations where they will be patrolling alone and have to defend themselves.

Your fiancée said that if she had been alone or with another woman on patrol, the situation would have been handled differently. This is not necessarily a bad thing as you seem so eager to jump to – studies have shown (https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/07/02/how-more-fem...) that women are better at de-escalating situations before they turn violent. If the rate of police deaths by gunfire is increasing, would it not be better to have cops who are able to prevent violent situations from happening, as well as deal with them effectively?

1 year 1 day ago

I must just start off to say your title was very engaging and humorous. You were great to analyze the authors one sided perspective of the issue. The author definitely focused on the economic downside of phasing out coal but left out important information such as the government subsidies. You explained that Canada should focus more on green energy. Do you have an preferred type of sustainable energy? I invite you to read my recent post about Tesla’s Solar panels. I have learned about the negatives of damming and nuclear so I was curious to what your thoughts might be? I thoroughly enjoyed your post though. The media can definitely report on anything to get publicity. As a population we should be moving forward and not focus on the criticism of doing so.

Link:
http://www.newsactivist.com/en/articles/management-biophysical-environme...

1 year 1 day ago

I really enjoyed your insightful perspective of the pros and cons of deforestation. I enjoyed the interesting facts of natural causes of deforestation such as the largest wildfire and mentioning the wildlife eating the seeds. You really touched on a relevant issue by talking about global warming. Trees both absorb and store carbon dioxide when growing but also release carbon dioxide when dying, decomposing or burning. It would be insightful to know the percentage of emissions caused from lumber and paper industry. I think that paper won’t be required in next decade as we going deeper into the digital age. Given that Canada is a staple country for lumber, do you think Canada should slow its industry?

Reply to: Heroin Epidemic
1 year 6 days ago

Ashepherd,

Your post stood out to me and was very informative with respect to the current epidemic that is opiate abuse. The examples you used helped to show the scary reality of what drug abuse can do to someone. As you mentioned, opiates come in many forms, currently in my hometown of Niagara Falls (CA) fentanyl use has become a growing concern as it is easier to access.

An article that I've attached below illustrates the increasing use of alternative forms of opiates like fentanyl, as more common ones like oxycodone become more heavily regulated. In 2010, the Ontario provincial government replaced the oxycodone pill with a more tamper-resistant form. This caused a shockwave to addicts who were forced to shift to other forms of drugs in order to fulfill their need, and as a result fentanyl has emerged a cheaper alternative. Ironically, data shows that since 2010, fentanyl related deaths have nearly doubled from 86 in 2010, to 165 in 2015.

The concept of addiction needs to be viewed as an illness or disease rather than a negative disposition towards that individual person. Many addicts are people who have endured multiple setbacks in their lives and as a result are unable to cope with the burdens that every day life can have. The problem is that access to most of these drugs is a lot easier and cheaper than heroin or oxycodone. Limiting access to one specific type of drug is not the answer, addicts will undoubtedly find other ways to abuse. There should be more governmental control over the distribution of these drugs and access should not be as easy.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-fentanyl-1.3874250

1 year 6 days ago

Hello,

The caption of your post seemed like an interesting read to me. You provide some very compelling evidence that details how overfishing and inadequate management policies are disrupting marine ecosystems. I agree that human intervention is the leading cause of the decline of fish stocks that we see worldwide as there is overwhelming evidence. Previous examples like the collapse of northern cod in Newfoundland (1992) should be used as a lesson to affirm the notion that strict management policies be implemented and directly followed by governments and industries. Although, I was hoping to learn more about how 'eco-labelling' can help the transition into more sustainable management decisions. In my opinion, eco-labelling is a good way to inform consumers of where and how their product was produced so that they can make educated decisions when deciding what to purchase. However, this does not address the problems of overfishing, illegal fishing and other issues that we still see today. Governments should be more accountable for these types of problems because they are the one's who control the industries. Similarly, the fishing industry must also be held accountable for certain practices they use as well as their level of ignorance with regards to sustainable forms of extracting fish. In the end, I think using eco-labels does provide a good way to inform consumers, but I believe the root of the problem lies primarily on those who exploit this resource and those who are in charge of applying sustainable management decisions.

1 year 6 days ago

Great post!

Gravel to green is a really interesting concept that aims to not really improve mental health, but the environment too. I think this would also be a great opportunity to plant more trees as well. By adding more green areas in urban environments as well as planting more trees will help reduce environmental impacts. Planting trees is a way to help offset carbon emissions, and by having this done more in urban areas could also help people to beware of the important role trees play. Overall I think it is a great idea, however I also think it is important to have the green spaces strategically placed within urban areas, for example a place where it can be easily reached, but does not impose on other necessary city elements. In launching this concept in many different areas could also allow for people to become more invested in environment and the struggles it is facing due to urban expansion

1 year 6 days ago

Great post Breanne,

I strongly agree with your post. I don’t think Canada has made at all the commitments to climate change as they should, but instead place a higher significant towards economic growth. This is especially problematic as the impacts on climate change continue to grow and the Canadian government still hasn't committed to making a leap of change. I agree that Canada’s reliance on fossil fuels is problematic in terms of introducing new more reliable energy sources. It seems that the Canadian government has other priories over the environment, as they don’t seem concerned about the potential impacts. I’m wondering what it will take for the government to finally make climate change a priority, I fear it won’t be until the impacts of climate change worsen. From an environmental standpoint, it makes more sense to help resolve issues before they worsen, however it doesn’t seem to take priority in the government over economic growth.

1 year 6 days ago

Hi AJ!

Thanks for your post, it was an interesting read! I think you touch upon a pressing issue being the vaccinations of children. It is extremely important for parents to vaccinate their children when they are newborns. Those who believe in homeopathy and Scientology have in some instances believed that their children do not need vaccinations, which has led to the death of the child and charges being pressed against the parents.

It is so critical that we are aware of the breakthroughs in science and what are considered to be the norms as far as healthcare and health of children and adults. There are just some things that can't be toyed with, as it's not worth a life.

Thanks for your input, let me know what you think :)

Davis

SUNY Genesee Community Colllege

University of Guelph

  • Management of the Biophysical Environment - 2016

    This course examines the role of the state in environmental issues. We examine the rationales, challenges and pitfalls inherent in state-led resource management. Students will be blogging on media coverage of important environmental issues throughout the course of the semester.

About the author

I am an Senior Instructional Designer working in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at the College at Brockport, State University of New York. I also am an adjunct faculty member, teaching in both the Communications and Education Department.

Institution

Class Subject