Chemistry and the Environment

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Brand.Stark on December 14, 2017
As Earth’s population continues to rise exponentially, there is a growing concern over the negative environmental consequences associated with powering such a rapid growth. Such a consequence is coal-induced air pollution, mainly caused by the developing world’s overreliance on said fossil fuel and the exorbitant amount they use and have access to. Air pollution has negative effects on the respective populations health, economy, quality of life and of their environments.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by gabrielleca on December 12, 2017
As a result of what people call “ocean dumping” and anthropogenic activities, the growing problem of marine debris has been identified as a threat to wildlife on the international level. More than 220 million tons of plastic are produced every year in the world and to the present day, estimates calculated that five trillions small pieces of this product are floating in our oceans.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by EzBillard on December 12, 2017
Of all the many things needed for life on Earth, one of the things that is most necessary but often taken for granted is breathing. In order for all life to continue on Earth, breathing is the most essential action above all, as even with food and water, without the appropriate gasses being absorbed in the lungs, gills or plants, life cannot be sustained. With this in mind it is important to realize that pollution causes poor air quality, which in turn leads to many deaths across the globe.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by David Morin on December 12, 2017
Climate change is one of the greatest threats faced by humanity in our time. It requires important economic, political, regulatory, technological as well as lifestyle’s changes around the world. In developed countries, where the emissions per capita tend to be much higher and where democracies are generally better implemented, such changes require the public to be well-informed and properly aware of that issue.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by nancy.deng on December 11, 2017
Deng, Nancy (75) B2A-LA Section 202 Chemistry and environment Superpost The impact of livestock on Earth

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by AudreyS on December 11, 2017
Audrey Samson, 86 All around the world, many countries are facing different environmental issues. Air pollution is a one of these huge issue that the majority of the countries around the world have to face. The following writing will start with a study made in Canada proving air pollution can be risk for breast cancer, afterwards will be about how it threats to the longevity of our heart, and finally about how it can cause social unrest in China.  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by louismekhael on December 11, 2017
In the world that we live in these days, very few are the places that are free of pollution. In fact, every country has different issues to treat concerning the environment. These different issues often come from their industrial activities or their habits in their day to day lives. Therefore, these important problems need to be solved, and fast to save this world we live in because the environment is only getting worst. Thus, many environmental professionals from many different countries did researches on the main local environmental issues.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Rainertaycho on December 11, 2017
The world is riddled with problems such as climate change, pollution, poverty, wars, and etc. These problems are currently unresolved and will most likely stay as is for longer periods of time. Although that is case, here are few examples of problems which can be addressed at a shorter period of time, and will help lessen the burden of the aforementioned problems.    Overpopulation:  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Rainertaycho on November 30, 2017
There have been all kinds of wars waged throughout history: wars waged in name of personal vendetta, war over land, war over religions and ideologies, war against rulers (kings not the measuring rulers), war against racism and sexism, and etc... A report from 1999 Statewatch stated that the currently increasing population could cause some serious repercussion to the environment as it cannot meet the demanded resources needed in order to sustain the consuming population.   

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by nancy.deng on November 30, 2017
            In recent news and media platform, it has been since the dawn of time that I could remember people discussing the issue of deforestation and specifically in the Amazonian forest. The Amazonian forest holds dear to every human being well at least it should, since it is known to be the lungs of our sole planet Earth. In the article “ Increased deforestation could substantially reduce Amazon basin rainfall” it discusses the relation found between the continuing harmful deforestation of the Amazon rainforest along with the amount of rain that bestow in the Amazon River basin.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Jonma on November 30, 2017
There have been concerns about environmental degradations for a while, but just how true are those statements and are they just rumors? Well according to scientist, the environment has been degrading at a rate unseen in the past 10 000 years. Land, freshwater and the generation of greenhouse gases are contributing to an unhealthy ecosystem at a rate that has never been seen before. The two major factor in this case are loss of biosphere integrity, land system change and the high level of phosphorus and nitrogen flowing into the oceans due to fertilizer use.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by David Morin on November 10, 2017
Environmental Conservation: a Large Task That Requires Very Large Protected Areas  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by helicopter_bus on November 9, 2017
The sea has many problems, some being the destruction of coral reefs, water pollution, global warming, acidification and also overfishing of sea creatures. Although all of these may take long to reconstruct if it is at all possible in order to save the ocean, the goal is to do something about it and start somewhere to make the difference. Overfishing is a big problem because this reduces the amounts of species in the ocean which also has reduced the fisheries of their stock by up to 90%.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Rainertaycho on November 9, 2017
A team of researchers discovered incredolous amounts of cadium and arsenic in the air of the hotspots of Portland, which can prove hazardous to human health such as development of anomalies in children and cancer. During the investigations of these hotspots, the same team of researchers found an unlikely indicator of highly polluted air: the moss named Orthotrichum lyelli, which is not only cheaper than the current method they are using, but also much much more economical.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Jonma on November 9, 2017
Experts in India claim that the air pollution would affect the country's plans to use solar pannels. They stated that it would affect the plans ina  negative way; "Experts said solar power generation is impacted by the dimming effect, a phenomenon wherein the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth's surface decreases due to the presence of pollutants in the air that absorb solar radiation and reflect it back into space.". This is bad news for solar powered plans and also a sign that solar powered energy cannot solve every problem.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by helicopter_bus on October 29, 2017
Deforestation is a major problem due to the different kinds of living species and plants that are dying. Although some of the causes of deforestation are done by forest fires, humans are the main problems. With logging in place this is a main cause of the issue. People harvest lumber, usually bringing the wood to sawmills or to a lumber yard. Logging causes the forest floors to dry out which creates a higher risk of forest fires. Calculations have been done to see how much logging has damaged undisturbed forest each year in 1996 and 1997, which was 10,000 to 15,000 km2.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by gabrielleca on October 27, 2017
It is known by a lot of people that Brazil was a very bad example of deforestation in the 1990s. In this period, an area the size of Belgium was destroyed in the Amazonian rainforest every year. Fortunately, Brazil has found ways to break the vicious circle in which it was and its deforestation fell by 70%, going from a 19500 km2 per year in 2005 to 5800km2 in 2008. If it had continued at this pace, a surplus of 3.2 billion tone of CO2 would have been released. This is why Brazil play an important role in climate change.

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Reply to: Ocean Management
1 month 3 hours ago

I chose to comment on your summary because i have seen alot of videos online about the plastic pollution massively affecting marine life, I also feel somewhat responsible as someone who used to live in one of the five countries that create at least 50% of the plastic pollution in the ocean. I agree that this is a problem that must be tackled immediately before the marine life are forced to adapt to a deterioration environment. According to the study "Global research priorities to mitigate plastic pollution impacts on marine life" by A.C Vector et al. "plastic pollution now impacts all marine and coastal habitats... [and its] impact on the physical condition of habitats has received little attention". According to the study, in more extreme cases, plastic pollution has been seen to alter the physico-chemical processes such as light and oxygen availability along with temperature and water movement, which leads to alteration in micro and meiobenthic communities and interruption of foraging pattern of key species.
The consequences of plastic waste is not only limited to 'how we get rid of it inland' but also its effects on both land and marine life if not disposed of properly. I believe this is a problem that must be tackled immediately because with the plastic pollution messing up the marine habitat and with the fisheries over exploiting the fishes, i don't think they would last another couple of centuries.

Work Cited:
https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/data/UQ_376116/UQ376116_OA.pdf?Expires=...

1 month 1 day ago

Hello Daija, I have selected to respond to your article because the fishing industry, especially in Canada constitutes for such a large amount of our food production. To add, Canada ranks 6th in the world for seafood exportation in an industry totaling 4.2 billion dollars for the country. Particularly, your article signals an alarming trend in the continued increase in fishery emissions by 21% since 1990. Also, it's interesting to read about how certain types of crustacean animals produce more emissions than others. Perhaps a way to mitigate the effects of fishery extractions could be to enforce a regulation that set a limit on the more emitting types of fish, thus reducing the overall impact on the environment. I agree with you when you state how, ultimately companies that produce so much and require output for the demand need to use more expensive alternatives when they are focused on making the most money possible. Since fish swim together it is a logical solution to exploit from this instead of fishing for lobsters that swim individually and require more complex solutions. Also, I believe the solution for such a problem should come from the countries who emit the most, those being China, Indonesia, Vietnam, United States, and Japan. Finally i'll end by mentioning a rather creative approach to the problem of enhanced fishery emissions. An article on Phys.org presented hybrid energy as profitable alternative seeing as “[t]he Master's student estimated that by using wind turbines and PV panels in addition to a diesel generator for handling the energy peaks, farms can reduce their CO2 emissions by almost 50 per cent, and a typical fish farm will at the same time be able to cut costs by 16 per cent”.

Works Cited:

https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/top-fish-and-seafood-exporting-count...

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-04-fish-farming-industry-climate-friendly.htm...

1 month 2 weeks ago

After reading your summary, I decided to chose your article because I found the topic interesting insofar as, typically, one wouldn't associate the melting of glaciers to warm water from beneath. In fact, the article mentioned an interesting fact that the melting of an underwater glacier the size of greater London had melted throughout the space of 5 years. I think that its rather alarming to think of all the natural disasters that could occur in the future given our current lifestyles. The article you chose is really interesting also in the sense that as the author mentions rising sea levels are an important threat to mankind. Also interesting is when you mention that the accumulated sea level rise could in the near future rise approximately 3 meters. Finally, I'll end off by mentioning that like you stated stopping the rise in sea levels is practically impossible and water levels will inevitably continue to rise however I would recommend maybe finding a way to slower sea level rise since stopping it entirely is impossible. Indeed, my suggestion would be to impose something that is already present, that being a protocol that would diminish carbon emissions.

Reply to: climate change
1 month 2 weeks ago

I chose to comment on this particular article because this was a perspective i had not thought of. I have not thought of the effects climate change might bring to our and other species' diets. According to the article "potential impact of climate change on world food supply, our doubling of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will only lead to a small decrease in global food production, although the developing countries will have to brunt of this problem as you have stated. This will do nothing to alleviate the already rising tensions between developed and developing countries. Scientists have performed multiple test on crops in order to
find solutions to cope with the rapid changing climate such as crop yield change methods and farm- level adaptations, under the assumption that water supply for irrigation would be available all over the place due to the rising sea level.

I think rather than trying to cure the problem we should be trying to prevent this in the first place. Although it might sound like a slippery slope, global warming could potentially cause another global war due to our waning food source. we should try decreasing our GhG emissions.
Work Cited:
http://ecoethics.net/cyprus-institute.us/PDF/Rosensweig-Food-Supply.pdf

Reply to: climate change
1 month 2 weeks ago

I chose to comment on this particular article because this was a perspective i had not thought of. I have not thought of the effects climate change might bring to our and other species' diets. According to the article "potential impact of climate change on world food supply, our doubling of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will only lead to a small decrease in global food production, although the developing countries will have to brunt of this problem as you have stated. This will do nothing to alleviate the already rising tensions between developed and developing countries. Scientists have performed multiple test on crops in order to
find solutions to cope with the rapid changing climate such as crop yield change methods and farm- level adaptations, under the assumption that water supply for irrigation would be available all over the place due to the rising sea level.

I think rather than trying to cure the problem we should be trying to prevent this in the first place. Although it might sound like a slippery slope, global warming could potentially cause another global war due to our waning food source. we should try decreasing our GhG emissions.
Work Cited:
http://ecoethics.net/cyprus-institute.us/PDF/Rosensweig-Food-Supply.pdf

2 months 1 week ago

Today (March 20 2018), we learned in class that DDTs and PCBs are what is often called persistent chemicals, and its effects on the environment such as biomagnification and bioaccumulation. When i read your article, a thought immediately popped in my mind "how about oil spills and its effects on the fish who live in it and the animals who drink the contaminated water?"
According to the article "The effects of oil spills on marine fish: Implication of spatial variation in natural mortality.", written by O. Langangen, Fish eggs and larvae tend to be very vulnerable to toxic oil compounds because of their small size. Even at small concentrations can prove fatal to small marine life such as the aforementioned. According to the article, depending on the spatial variation, the effects could either lessen or worsen. The study was concluded with the statement that this problem is being largely underestimated and that it is possible to control the effects of oil spill as long as the spill is immediately contained.

I believe that this is another problem that we tend to avoid because oil is such a precious commodity to people that they think of the lost profits rather than the lives that will be lost when seeing such a spill. Thank you for raising this subject.

Work Cited:
https://ac.els-cdn.com/S0025326X17302552/1-s2.0-S0025326X17302552-main.p...

2 months 3 weeks ago

Thank you for taking your time to write your summary about this. I like the bit about the big companies taking a step back and looking back at what they are truly doing, as they really, really should.
Onto the matters presented, this took an interesting turn for me as most of the articles i have read about the problems of building more Dams in Amazon are about Indigenous people's way of lives. In a way this shows that building these Dams threaten more than just human life but biodiversity itself.
According to a study of sustainable development discourse on indigenous people in the Brazilian Amazon in the context of the proposed Belo Monte hydroelectric dam,although it is great that we are looking forward to a sustainable future, the problem is that the only thing we are sustaining is human life, at the cost of other lives, both human and non-human.
Also, during the proposal of the creation of the dam, the companies have agreed to the creation of maintenance of ecological reserves for the threatened fauna along with the creation of new infrastructure as a support to the possible influx of migration to bigger cities. What they arent considering though is that with the creation of new infrastructure, more land will be taken up causing the same type of damages to the environment and society, It is appreciated that these companies are at least thinking of bettering this world through the lessening of pollution, there are still other ways of keeping Brazil Amazon light up such as improvement on solar power which for some reason was not presented as an alternative source of power. It has been presented that hydroelectric power is the only alternative to fossil fuels.
Looking back to your comment on how companies should look back at what they do, hopefully they soon do as more and more companies are rising up and with the population increasing we need a better way of sustaining out livelihood without compromising the future.
Work Cited:
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4c9a/8fd51cea7019c7a2f9e2a165404a0bdc62...

2 months 3 weeks ago

To begin, I decided to choose your article summary because the topic was not only very interesting, but also very intriguing. Without a question the topic you have selected is immensely important however in my opinion it's an issue that we as humans wrongly overlook, in the sense that we often perceive this issue as sustainable and untroubling for current and approaching generations, when in actuality the points you addressed would help mitigate any future risks through finding solutions now, before the situation becomes troubling. For instance I agree with your point that local and national governments must enforce regulations on how water is used and distributed seeing as the last thing you want s a society taking for granted this supply (water) simply becauseit is available. Personally, I believe that by using a mathematical model to predict water shortages could only be seen as a positive, although i don't think that we should use this method as the sole way to predict our water needs. For example, the ''Government of Canada'' published on their website an article on water availability for each province and identified Quebec as a province with a low threat to water availability through the water availibility indicator (Government of Canada, 2017). Thus, Canada's approach to water scarcity is different than other countries such as ones with mostly warm and dry conditions without many water bassins or water bodies, like Jordan, a country with a mosty arid climate. In fact, the article entitled ''Water starved'' states how ''Jordan has one of the lowest levels of water resource availability'' and nearly 94 % of ''total rainfall volume (... is) evaporated'' (Syeda Areeba, 2018, 40-41). The problem with Jordan is that the countries population is expected to double and water shortage is expected to increase due to global warming. This has led the country to be classifed as water scarce, and being a country that relies on its precipitation (however little it may be) causes a serious risk that cannot be relieved by only predicting water shortage through historic data. My point is that for a country facing a water crisis, the auhtor of he aformentioned article argues that a possible solution could be to recycle and reuse the municipalities' waste water. I would also argue for this solution atop of setting government regulations like you had mentioned in the opinion section of your article.

Bibliography:

Rasheed, S. A. (2018, 01). Water starved. Southasia, 22, 40-41. Retrieved from https://proquest-crc.proxy.ccsr.qc.ca/docview/1987360830?accountid=44391

Government of Canada. (2017, 04). Water Availability: Indicator Initiative. Canada. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/water-overv...

5 months 3 weeks ago

I strongly agree with you that municipalities need to find new ways of waste disposal because landfill spaces are rare and it is a threat to the environment. You proposed compost as an efficient way to dispose of the organic waste and I found one city in the United-State that is not only mastering this technique but also the overall champion of zero waste. San-Francisco will soon reach his goal of 100% recycled waste and is proving to the world that this objective is possible and profitable. The Pier 96 is the 20000 m2 biggest center of recycling in the world and was build to achieve a goal they established in 2013 to have zero waste by the year 2020. In 2015, they were already at 80% of recycled waste, which mean they are getting very close to their objective. In this huge recycling center of San Fransisco, the organic matter that is collected at night is used to produce 650 tons of compost that is then sold to the farms in the region. What is also great with the Pier 96 is that it created 178 jobs really well paid and reserved for people living in poor neighbourhoods. Furthermore, the enormous Hilton Hotel of this city has, since 2000, compost all leftovers from its 7500 meal served daily. They were able to save 250000 dollars per year just by reducing the costs related to the picking up of waste. This is why in 2005, the 4500 restaurants in the city followed the Hilton example and started to compost. I think that San Francisco sends a very positive image to other big cities and prove them that everything is achievable.

article:
https://proquest-crc.proxy.ccsr.qc.ca/cbcacomplete/docview/1735884568/9C...

5 months 3 weeks ago

The impacts of meat consumption on the environment are of great concern as you mention in your article. Nevertheless, they are often overlooked by environmentalists. Hence, I congratulate you for having taken the time to explore this issue.

First, I completely agree that food production takes a large portion of the US land area. As a matter of fact, this is a global problem. Specifically, the livestock production takes 70% of all agricultural land, and 30% of the Earth’s global surface (Ilea, 2). Thus, one of the main causes of global deforestation is animal farming (Ilea 8). Indeed, large areas are necessary for animals to graze, and for the production of their feed (Ilea 8). For example, from 1990 to 2000, the Amazon rainforest lost “an area twice the size of Portugal […], most of it to pasture” (Ilea 8). Similarly, 50% of the global production of corn and 80% of that of soy is intended to feed farm animals (Ilea 8). As you partly noted, meat production can, as a result, cause biodiversity losses, soil erosion, and deforestation (Ilea 8).

However, while reading your second paragraph I did not see how your argument proved your conclusion. Indeed, while you state that the US food production, may it be for meat or for plant, use a large amount of energy and is not sustainable, you conclude that a vegan diet is much more sustainable than a meat-based one. Although your conclusion is reasonable, the statistics you provide do not prove it. Nevertheless, in addition to the other environmental consequences aforementioned, the livestock sector does have a significant impact on global warming. As a matter of fact, the livestock sector is responsible for 18% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, which is more than those of all transport (Ilea 2). More specifically, meat production is responsible for 68% of anthropogenic nitrous oxide emissions, 64% of anthropogenic ammonia emissions, and 35–40% of anthropogenic methane emissions (Ilea 4). While methane and nitrous oxide respectively have a global warming potential 23 and 296, nitrous oxide also contribution to the ozone depletion and ammonia plays a significant role in the acidification of rain (Ilea 4).

Similarly, meat production also consumes much more water than the production of cereal, as you noted. Nevertheless, the statistics you provide do not match those I found. Indeed, you mention that producing 1 kg of animal protein requires 100 times more water than 1 kg of grain. What I found, however, is that the production of 1 kg of meat takes from 2.5 to 20 times more water than the production of 1 kg of grain (Ilea 9). As a result, “diets based on meat from grain-fed cattle may take two times more water than pure vegetarian ones” (Ilea 9). Nonetheless, this is a real problem, especially with increasing water shortages that are expected; in fact, “64% of the world’s population is expected to live in water-stressed sectors by 2025” (Ilea 9). Furthermore, the nutrients from livestock’s manure are important sources of water pollution (Ilea 9).

Finally, the rapid population growth will indeed make all these problems worse if no changes are made. The population of the United States is indeed expected to increase, as the projections are now expecting, to 447,883,000 people in 2100 (United Nations, 28).

Hence, while some suggest that the population growth should be controlled, it is certain that developed countries’ consumption of animal products will need to be decreased (Ilea 12). In fact, if the global trend is not changed, the world livestock will consume as much as 4 billion people by 2050 (Ilea 12).

United Nations. “World Population Prospects.” Department of Economic and Social
Affairs, 2017, https://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Publications/Files/WPP2017_KeyFindings.pdf

Ilea, Ramona C. "Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental
Concerns, and Ethical Solutions." Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, vol. 22, no. 2, 2009, pp. 153-167, Research Library, https://proquest-crc.proxy.ccsr.qc.ca/docview/196572554?accountid=44391, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10806-008-9136-3.

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