Champlain ETHICS 1283 (Nicole Fournier-Sylvester)

About this class

Ethical Issues in the Social Sciences

Champlain College Saint-Lambert

Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by steal this post on September 16, 2013
Article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jan-schakowsky/to-celebrate-labor-day-gi_b_3855532.html  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by marieboulanger on September 11, 2013
Torture had always been an effective way to obtain something from someone else. Therefore it had been used throughout history to whether retrieve information, get people to confess or simply as a punishment. People in ancient Rome have gone as far as making it a public event. Fortunately, since then things have change. The turning point of torture happened during the eighteenth century and now there are norms such as the Geneva Conventions and the UN Convention.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by alexandrosegreti on September 10, 2013
Alexandro SegretiThe Relation Between Violence and Gun Control Laws

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by a.victoria11 on September 10, 2013
http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/trudeau-not-concerned-by-potential-border-troubles-after-pot-admission-1.1445228#.Ui6diBR2UPc.email

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by clairechaurand on September 10, 2013
Two Canadians, a doctor and a filmmaker, were arrested and held in a prison in Cairo, Egypt. The two men were present in downtown Cairo on their way to Gaza to train emergency room doctors and hope to film a documentary about it while violence between the Muslim Brotherhood and security forces was taking place. As they stopped to ask for directions back to their hotel after curfew at a police station that night, they were accused of being part of the Muslim Brotherhood. These men were had a number of false allegations held against them and were imprisoned.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by alexis.nobert on September 10, 2013
The United States is always trying to protect them from terrorism and they have put in place many prevention techniques. One of these techniques is managed by the National Security Agency (NSA) and consists of collecting data from people’s personal phone calls and emails.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by alexandrobellis... on September 10, 2013
Have you ever felt cheated, mislead or felt like privacy does not exist anymore, that is what 10 individuals felt when they filed a law suit against Google for invading their privacy. Google was planning to read the public’s emails so that they can sell ads and make more money. Reading the public’s private emails is wrong to the public but not according to Google, because they would like to overturn the lawsuit thinking that it will help the public in the long run.

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by GF11 on September 10, 2013
                    Canadian faces an issue towards gun owning and gun control. The government holds a registry that permits us to know who has a gun and basic information about that weapon. For some people this is offending and needless spending of money in addition to being a violation of privacy and freedom. Those in favour of the registry says it is valuable to law enforcement and could potentially save lives.  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by fredgagnon7 on September 9, 2013
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/08/29/syria-us-attack-legal-un.html An illegal duty                 As everyone knows today, a terrible crime in Syria occurred on August 21st. In fact, Syrian dictator Bashar Assad used chemical weapons on his own people in regions kept by the rebels. This attack resulted in the deaths of thousand of victims that were innocent citizens, which brought up numerous concerns from people all around the world.  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by riccardozhai on September 9, 2013
The issue of marijuana legalization/decriminalization in Canada having been brought to public attention recently by Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, journalists Tobi Cohen and Andrea Hill of the Vancouver Sun in their article "Not everyone high on pot's economic benefits" thought it appropriate to clarify both sides of the argument concerning this issue on a financial standpoint. The medical aspect of marijuana use/consumption is not treated in the subject article or in this post.  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Paul0014 on September 8, 2013
http://theconversation.com/the-ethics-of-opt-out-organs-17711  

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Champlain College, Saint-Lambert
by Cheng Hu on September 8, 2013
Parti Québécois government introduced a proposed legislation which called "Charter of Quebec values" that interdicts social workers from wearing religious symbols in the workplace. This proposal has led to an intense debate in the province. It makes many people choose between their beliefs and jobs. Some say that religious symbols do not do any harm to the society and if this proposal becomes a law it may be hard for them to find workers in some specific area such as daycares.

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Student

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8 years 1 month ago

I find this post very interesting and it sparks up some debate. Torture is wrong and actually does more harm than good. Just like during the Salem witch trials, torture is excruciating and victims will say or do whatever it takes to make the pain or torment end. These pleas of guilt are therefore invalid and do not really reflect the truth. That is besides the fact that it is inhumane and rather primitive. In regards to obtaining information to save millions of lives, there are less barbaric ways of doing so. What would our society be like if everyone would plea guilt for any accused crimes because of excruciating pain or torment?

8 years 1 month ago

I find this post very interesting and it sparks up some debate. Torture is wrong and actually does more harm than good. Just like during the Salem witch trials, torture is excruciating and victims will say or do whatever it takes to make the pain or torment end. These pleas of guilt are therefore invalid and do not really reflect the truth. That is besides the fact that it is inhumane and rather primitive. In regards to obtaining information to save millions of lives, there are less barbaric ways of doing so. What would our society be like if everyone would plea guilt for any accused crimes because of excruciating pain or torment?

8 years 1 month ago

I would like to say that I was drawn to your article because it was an interesting subject that brought up information that I wasn’t aware of. In addition, this news summary was very clear and represented the two sides of the argument well. Organ donation is an issue that often passes under the radar, but one that is very important in potentially saving many lives. This “opt out” policy permits exactly that. I agree with you that the greater good, in this situation, is an ethical principle that prevails over the value of freedom. I believe that if a person feels strongly enough about not wanting to donate his/her organs after dying, then they will take the necessary steps to prevent it from happening. The supply of organs is, as you mentioned, experiencing shortages, and this new policy is a way of countering that. Many people, with the “opt in” policy, maybe didn’t make the time to register as a donor, and therefore missing a chance to save a life. By giving the possibility to “opt out”, individual rights are not violated, and therefore, I think that the benefits from this new policy outweigh the consequences people might see in it.
With that said, it would be interesting to know the percentages of the population that are for, against, or indifferent to organ donation. Does such a ratio exist, and does it support the “opt out” policy?

Reply to: An Illegal Duty
8 years 1 month ago

I think you are right. Syria's government did an horrible act by lauching attacks on its own people. When you are one of the most powerfull nation in the world like the U.S. I think it is your duty to act for the greater good of the population of Syria who can no longer trust their government. I think legal actions like this one are not unethical because you act for the good of some population and in the best interest of everyone. The UN standards of procedures are compromising in this case but I am sure they can agree its for the best. That being, countries should deal witht the UN before doing such actions and super powers like the U.S. have to be'' the little countries big brother ''in a way and watch over them.

Reply to: An Illegal Duty
8 years 1 month ago

I think you are right. Syria's government did an horrible act by lauching attacks on its own people. When you are one of the most powerfull nation in the world like the U.S. I think it is your duty to act for the greater good of the population of Syria who can no longer trust their government. I think legal actions like this one are not unethical because you act for the good of some population and in the best interest of everyone. The UN standards of procedures are compromising in this case but I am sure they can agree its for the best. That being, countries should deal witht the UN before doing such actions and super powers like the U.S. have to be'' the little countries big brother ''in a way and watch over them.

8 years 1 month ago

After reading your title, what interested me about your topic is the standpoint from which you write it. I find it interesting that you decided to focus on whether or not abortion in minors should be hidden rather than the topic of abortion in general; it’s a fresh take on an old issue. I agree with your point of view; saying that telling a parent about abortion should be up to the girls. I believe that if you are in a household where there is trust, respect and support, no girl or woman would feel uncomfortable or ashamed of her situation. Any young girl would be afraid of telling her parents about the issue of teen pregnancy and abortion, but a young girl that is too afraid to discuss it with her parents reflects on the type of relationship she maintains with her family. I believe that this is where the value or principle of family relies, on whether or not your child is comfortable enough to tell you about her situation, and asks for your help. If parents have done their jobs correctly, these young girls are educated about sexual activity and its consequences. And if they are old enough to engage in these activities, then they are old enough to deal with the consequences on their own if they wish. Autonomy, or the respect of autonomy, is an ethical principle that we should respect.
As shown in recent statistics, abortion levels are increasing in young woman. Is this a result of the sexualisation of women in the media? Is our society becoming too eager to engage in sexual activities as a result?

8 years 1 month ago

After reading your title, what interested me about your topic is the standpoint from which you write it. I find it interesting that you decided to focus on whether or not abortion in minors should be hidden rather than the topic of abortion in general; it’s a fresh take on an old issue. I agree with your point of view; saying that telling a parent about abortion should be up to the girls. I believe that if you are in a household where there is trust, respect and support, no girl or woman would feel uncomfortable or ashamed of her situation. Any young girl would be afraid of telling her parents about the issue of teen pregnancy and abortion, but a young girl that is too afraid to discuss it with her parents reflects on the type of relationship she maintains with her family. I believe that this is where the value or principle of family relies, on whether or not your child is comfortable enough to tell you about her situation, and asks for your help. If parents have done their jobs correctly, these young girls are educated about sexual activity and its consequences. And if they are old enough to engage in these activities, then they are old enough to deal with the consequences on their own if they wish. Autonomy, or the respect of autonomy, is an ethical principle that we should respect.
As shown in recent statistics, abortion levels are increasing in young woman. Is this a result of the sexualisation of women in the media? Is our society becoming too eager to engage in sexual activities as a result?

8 years 1 month ago

I was inclined to reading this post because of the title, and how it made me reflect for a moment on my stance on torture, and what could be arguments to defend both positions of this debate. Personally, after reading your text, my position remains against torture. Although you discussed the CIA's and other authorities using torture, you didn't really define what kinds of methods they used that are labelled as torture. Torture has a history of being dehumanizing and unethical, and that hasn’t changed. Torture in all it’s forms is a violation of human rights. If there is another way of obtaining the information or confession, then why not use this resource. I understand the need to protect the larger population, but torture is an outright violation of human rights, and of the golden rule. I recognize the principle of the greater good, and the value of security, but physical torture is, in my opinion, not the solution. I would like to believe that society has evolved since the time of Ancient Rome, and that we now know more about interrogation to have developed new techniques that are as effective as torture.
In the case where the torture was performed on an innocent man, what then? Do you just apologize and shake hands?

8 years 1 month ago

Egypt being in an unstable political state, I was intrigued by your title. Like you, I do not believe that the two Canadian men deserved to be imprisoned during those 15 days. From what I read from the article, there was no conclusive evidence of the two men committing the crimes that they were accused of( belonging to an armed gang;threatening security and social peace;disabling public transport and communications;possession of firearms, ammunition and explosives), and thus authorities should have respected their autonomy. However, it is important to note that Egypt is still politically unstable and I think that the arrest was only a precautionary measure, but that does not excuse the use of torture. As you said, doing harm onto others should not be allowed in any circumstance, but the arrest itself was done in the interest of general beneficence. If the two men were to hypothetically be terrorists, would the torture have been justified?

8 years 1 month ago

The situation in Syria is an important global issue at the moment that should be discussed thoroughly. As you mentioned in your post, the evidence as to whom used the chemical weapons is still not conclusive in the eyes of the United Nations and therefore, further investigation is needed before intervention. But if the Syrian government is found to be responsible, I also believe intervention to be the best course of action for the greater good of the people and to keep people from harm’s way. For the intervention to be valid however, I think it should be limited in its assistance and let the majority population fight for its own freedom, for with extended military assistance, there is a risk of over-reaching into another country’s politics in a way that destabilizes the situation even more. How would the situation improve if the country where to be controlled by another political force just as ruthless as the previous ruling party?

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