Post 2 Comparison

by Antonina Caruana on April 2, 2014 - 8:12pm

Post #2- India/Pakistan and Canada/Quebec Comparison

 

India is a culturally diverse country much like Canada today.  India’s main religious groups were composed of Hindus, which represented a majority, and Muslims which were a minority.  Despite sharing a common territory the two groups had conflicting views in which brought much debate as to what identified Indian nationalism.  This conflict according to Ali Jinnah’s Two Nation Theory was inevitable.  Jinnah’s Two Nation Theory stated that Hindus and Muslims have two entire different ways of life, they do not share common holidays, beliefs, or values.  This theory was created when Jinnah changed his views from Hindu-Muslim unity to a Muslim separatist view.  Jinnah’s view change was due to a lack of belief towards Ghandi’s success in achieving non violent movements. 

In comparison to India, Canada/Quebec’s diversity has also resulted in two main groups, which are the English and the French.  The linguistic difference has resulted in a difference of views, much like the Hindus and Muslims.  In Canada, the French value the continuation of the French language.  Quebec separatist ideas are comparable to the formation of Pakistan, in 1947, in which Indian Muslims obtained their own land to become a majority and avoid further conflicts with Hindus.  In both India and Canada, the difference in cultural groups caused conflicts and the desire to become a majority with their each independent territories.

 

Sources of Indian Tradition Volume ll: Modern India and Pakistan, edited by William Theodore de Bary and Stephan Hay, Columbia University Press, 1988.

 

   

Comments

i agree with your point that the two religions are indeed very different. They do not share holidays, beliefs and sometimes values. They cannot inter-marry or eat together, even out of respect. These are valid differences that can separate a nation, it almost makes the fear of loosing a language seem pitiful and irrelevant, because although Hindus and Muslims disagree, India still hold approx. 200 languages under one roof. Food for thought.

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