Blog Research 1: Relationship Between Nursing Shortages, Job Satisfaction, Stress, and Burnout Levels Among Nurses in Oncology/Hematology Settings

by Acola2 on October 21, 2013 - 11:30pm

 
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The article I found was a systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and job satisfaction, stress, and burnout levels among nurses in oncology/hematology settings. The basis of the study or the research problem, was to find the best evidence to link all of the above components together to see how it affects nurses in the oncology/hematology setting that are dealing with the nursing shortage. In order to do so, the author of the Scholarly Journal looked seven descriptive and descriptive-correlation studies based on the geographical setting, sample size, outcome measures used, and outcomes. By using these seven studies based on those objectives, the author was able to come to conclusions about the relationship between the nursing shortage, and job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels among nurses in oncology/hematology. All together 2,109 oncology nurses participated in the seven survey and almost half of them stated that there were not enough nurses in the work place to deliver quality patient care, and many were uncertain about their futures with the job they were in. 80% of nurses in the one study, stated that they had a difficult time retaining experienced RNs which resulted in inadequate staffing which causes overtime hours, double shifts and reliance on supplement staffing. Also, nurses in the oncology setting experience were twice more likely to experience emotional exhaustion. So in summary, the nursing shortage has affected nurses in the oncology department by having extra stress, and burnout.

 

 

The most important information in this article is the seven descriptive and descriptive-correlation studies. They are important because they are the basis of the Scholarly Journal and from there you can make evaluations on how the nursing shortage has affected job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels among nurses in oncology/hematology settings.  For example, the one study named Bakker, stated that 40% of nurses taken from the 615 nurses that were survey, stated they dealt with inadequate staffing, and 15% were dissatisfied, to the point were 6.3% had intentions of leaving. Another one of the descriptive-correlation studies named Emery, that looked at 155 nurses stated that excessive workload was the second top stressor, and also lack of adequate staffing was a top stressor.  Yet another study named  Friese, which looked at 305 nurses, stated that staffing adequacy was a strong predictor of oncology nurses jobs satisfaction and emotional exhaustion, and they were 84% and 80% less likely to report these issues with adequate staffing. In a fourth study, named Buerhaus, of the 494 nurses surveyed,  60% indicated suboptimal staffing over the past year, and that if affected an RNs job satisfaction. By looking at just some of the information that was provided in just a few of the seven studies, you are able to make assumptions and conclusions that relationship between the nursing shortage and job satisfaction, stress, and burnout levels does have a negative effect on nurses in a oncology/hematology setting, therefor, the seven articles are the most important information in this Scholarly Journal. 

 
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APA Citation: 

 

Toh, S., Ang, E., & Devi, M. (2012). Systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels among nurses in oncology/haematology settings. International Journal Of Evidence-Based Healthcare,10(2), 126-141.

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