Spy Parents

by lmsze on September 18, 2013 - 11:31pm

In today's society, technology involves in every domain of people's life. People watch television, use cellphone, computers...etc. Doctors use machines to treat their patients. Police use gadgets and tracking devices to capture and arrest thieves. Even parent are using technology to spy on their children as in the example mentions in the article. This article really caught my attention, because it happens to me and friends around me. I remember one time when i was using facebook, my parent were always standing behind me and watching what i was doing.It really bothers me a lot, because there is no more pravacy.  Moreover, my friend's parents even put a GPS on his car to check his location and installing many apps to spy on him.This is really exaggerate. Parent are saying that it is for make sure their children's security, but isn't it overlimit? Should parent spy on their children? 

 

As a teenager, i don't think parents should spy on thier kids, because it invades privacy. In the example in the article, the daughter has to think very carefully before she posts  online, because she doesn't know when her father are watching. This gives a lot pressure on the kids, because you have to think a thousand time if it is good or bad before you post something online. When parent spying on their children,  it doesn't respect their privacy at all , specially when they don't tell to their kids after they observe their online activities. I think parent should ask permission of the kids before checking on their onlines activies or their property instead of stalking on their children like a henchman or weird guy. It is disrespectful to the teenager, it shows a bad image to them. Invading people's privacy are harmful.

 

On the other hand, parent argue that it is for their children's safety, because it is dangerous on the internet. Specially, the new generation use internet to communicate, sometimes even with strangers. Parent are saying that they only want to see what their kids are doing or who they are playing with and make sure they don't do inllegal thing with bad people.

 

But should we consider privacy as an important issue, even the gouvernment is spying on all the population by listening to people's conversation on phone or putting camera on all the streets?

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/16/children-activities-online-spying

Comments

My parents always really trusted me so they never monitored or spied anything I was doing on the Internet. I am really grateful for that. But anyway, they could have not since I always take my precautions for all my accounts or anything I don’t want them to see remain private (there are tools for that). This article really interested me because privacy is really important to me, but at the same time I understand how one parent would want to spy on what his kid is doing on the Internet.
Not respecting one’s privacy is unethical in my opinion. Doing it in his back - in other words, spying - is even a lot worse. When it comes to parents spying their children, it is a delicate subject because they are doing it for their good. However, there are limits about what a parent can do to monitor his child’s activity. First of all, you should always begin with the basis of trusting your children. You should not spy what they are doing “just to make sure” that they are doing nothing wrong. There needs to be some concrete motives and suspicions before the parent spy what his child is doing. Otherwise, if you spy on them for no reason and they find out, you will break the trust you have with your child. As said, it is okay just to verify one time, or even monitor what the child is doing if there is the need to. However, it is very important to let the child know because otherwise you invade their privacy in an unethical way.
Indeed, there can be some dangerous things on the Internet, but spying is not the way to go; prevention and awareness are. Simply sit down with your child, let him know about the risks of the Internet and that you trust him. In return, he will trust you too and will more easily share with you what usage of the Internet he does. Anyways, I suggest you this article for further reading: http://ezinearticles.com/?Should-We-Spy-on-Our-Kids-Use-of-Cell-Phones-a...

This topic raises a lot of interesting topic. As a matter of fact, these days, teenagers tend to do more bad thing than they used to. For example, illegal activity and drugs. I find it interesting to know how the attitudes of teens will change with parents spying on them.

Although parents should know the activities and interest of their children there is a limit to how much they have to do. For example, if the teen is spied on 24 hours everyday, then this is no different from being in prison having freedom banned. Privacy is indeed an important value that we all agree on, but sometimes teens who does not think straight use that to their advantage to revolt against against their parents. In other words they are spoiled. That is why I think that parents must know a lot of their children in order to get them back on the right track in their life. I think that teen smoker are a good example because most of the time they do not listen to their parents advice and become like how society thinks of them today (ignorant). I think that spying with digital device is exaggerating, because if the parents does not stop spying on their child then some may develop dependency on the parent and they would not be able to be independent in the future.

For further reading : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/9815906/Should-parents-sp...

The issue at hand is very intriguing to me as I can relate personally to parents spying on their own children.

To answer your question; yes, privacy should be considered an important issue, but this can vary according to the situation. For example, the statement (/question?) you bring up about government spying on their citizens is weak. If BASIC privacy needs were violated, such as having pictures taken of me while I’m in my house, bugging my room or even a camera INSIDE my room, then this would be an issue. However, this is not the case, complaining about having your privacy invaded on a phone call or a camera public grounds; that is ridiculous. To begin, the government wouldn’t care about how your weekend was as you chat your way to your friends. Also, how is putting a camera on a street a privacy issue? When it is clearly a public territory.

However, on the other hand, I agree to some of your views on the ethical issue dealt in your post. Parents who go on their child’s social network account argues to be doing it for “safety”. That is hysterical, as if logging on your son’s Facebook account will stop him from enrolling in criminal movements. There are many ways to be endangered in illegal activities without the parents even tracking it. Will observing your daughter’s Facebook and lecturing her about certain subjects, make her respect you? No, it works against that and provokes the daughter to the point they disrespect you.

Speaking of privacy, there is an important issue I would suggest reading on government observation of Social networks. Government invasion of social networks and search engines should not be frowned upon. As you’re tagging yourself onto Facebook photos, do you honestly think you’re trying to “protect” your privacy? The very fact that you agreed to the Terms and Conditions of a social networking website, means you gave up many rights in order to use this tool. How can you agree to conditions, then complain about the conditions later on believing you’re righteous?

Those actions are so idiotic, it is equivalent to running into a crowd of people and screaming, “HEY GUYS! I JUST COVERED MYSELF IN DIRT AND OIL. AND I ENJOYED IT!” The crowd laughs and comments on your action, then you scream in reply, “OMG WHAT THE HELL, RESPECT MY PRIVACY.” Yeah that’s how ignorant it looks when people argue about privacy on Twitter and Facebook.

For further reading: http://www.applieddatalabs.com/content/how-and-why-government-stalking-you

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